Educator: Publications

This short list of publicaitons includes must-reads for any teacher seeking to improve their ability to develop and deliver culturally-relevant curricula.

Title Citation
URL Information
Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools

Alaska Native Knowledge
Network. 1998.
Alaska
Standards for
Culturally
Responsive
Schools.
Fairbanks: Alaska
Native Knowledge Network.

https://uaf.edu/
ankn/publications/pdfs/Cultural
Standards.pdf
This guide to teaching in Alaska provides cultural standards for students, educators, schools, curriculum, and communities. It is endorsed by many Alaska Native organizations, including the Alaska Federation of Natives. It is an invaluable resource for anyone associated with teaching in Alaska. The guidelines can easily be applied to teaching in an context, and would be equally valuable for educators in other parts of the world (like Hawaii). It is available as a free download from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Cross Cultural Studies. 
Alaska Native Education: Views from Within Barnhardt, Ray,
and Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar
(Eds.). 2010. Alaska Native
Education: Views
from Within. Fairbanks:Alaska
Native Knowledge Network.
https://epay.alaska.
edu/C21563_ustores/web/store_main.jsp?

STOREID=82&SINGLESTORE=true

This publication is a must read for any teacher who works in Alaska, especially those teachers who work with Alaska Native students but are not themselves Alaska Native. While every article is valuable, TASK teachers may be particularly interested in the following essays:

“Culture, Chaos, and Complexity” (2006), by Ray Barnhardt and Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley, pp. 199–218.
“Education and the Subsistence Way of Life” (1974), by Art Davidson and Harold Napoleon, pp. 241–252.
“Alaska Native Traditional Knowledge and Ways of Knowing” (1994), by Carl Hild, pp. 161–176.
“Follow the Lights: Native Ways of Knowing” (2005), by Bernice Joseph, pp. 119–124. 
“The Indigenous Worldview of Yupiaq Culture” (1998), by Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley, Delena Norris-Tull, and Roger Norris-Tull, pp. 219–236. 
“Decolonizing Western Alaska” (1998), by Perry T. Mendenhall, pp. 307–312. 
“Western Society’s Linear Systems and Aboriginal Cultures” (1990), by Larry Merculieff, pp. 183–192. 
“Serving the Purpose of Education” (1989), by Leona Okakok, pp. 99–118. 
“Who Controls Alaska Native Education?” (2001), by Paul Ongtooguk, pp. 301–305. 
“Education and Cultural Self-Determination” (2010), by Paul Ongtooguk, pp. 313–316. 
“Their Silence About Us: Why we need an Alaska Native Curriculum” (2010), by Paul Ongtooguk, pp. 237–239. 
“Growing up to be Tlingit” (1998), by Walter Soboleff, pp. 147–160.

Sharing Our Pathways: Native Perspectives on Education in Alaska Barnhardt, Ray,
and Kawagley, Angayuqaq Oscar
(Eds.). 2011. Sharing
Our Pathways:
Native Perspectives
on Education in
Alaska. Fairbanks: Alaska Native Knowledge Network.
https://epay.alaska.
edu/C21563_ustores/web/store_main.jsp?

STOREID=82&SINGLESTORE=true
A follow-up to the previous publication, in this edited compilation of essays Barnhardt and Kawagley highlight valuable insights concerning Alaska Native education. Like Alaska Native Education, Sharing Our Pathways is a must read for any teacher who works with Alaska Native students—particularly those teachers who are themselves not Alaska Native. The following essays may be of special interest to TASK teachers:
 
“Inuit Studies: Some Reflections” (2002), by Maricia Ahmasuk, pp. 125–128.
“Learning the Iñupiaq Language” (1998), by Martha Aiken, pp. 73–76.
“Integrating Culturally-Responsive School Standards in Education” (2003), by Yaayuk Bernadette Alvanna-Stimpfle, pp. 129–131.
“Alaska Native Education: Past, Present, and Future” (2003), by Doreen Andersen-Spear and Eben Hopson, pp. 1–6.
“What’s in a Name?” (1996), by Rachel Craig, pp. 61–66.
“Challenges in Alaska Native Education Today” (1995), by Rachel Craig, pp. 49–53.
“Traditional Knowledge, Environmental Assessment, and the Clash of Two Cultures” (1999), by Richard Glenn, pp. 81–84.
“Integrating Indigenous Knowledge into Education” (1997), by Elmer Jackson, pp. 67–70. 
“Minnie Aliitchak Qapviatchialuk Gray, Ambler” (1999), by Elmer Jackson, pp. 77–79. 
“Traditional Methods of Healing and Medicines for Science Fair Projects” (2000), by Elmer Jackson, pp. 89–92.
“New Pathways to Excellence” (1997), by Florence Kuzuguk, pp. 71–72.
“The Time is Right to Write” (2000), by Dorothy M. Larson, pp. 85–88.
“Aspects of Traditional Iñupiat Education” (2000), by Paul Ongtooguk, pp. 91–102.
“Native Languages in Alaska” (2002), by Ruthie Sampson, pp. 111–124. 
“Nikaitchuat Ixisabviat: An Iñupiaq Immersion School” (2002), by Igxubuq Dianne Schaeffer, pp. 106–110. 
“Alaska Native Cultural Integration into the Curriculum” (1996), by Martha Stackhouse, pp. 54–60. 
“Community Values and Beliefs” (2001), by Bernice Tetpon, pp. 101–105. 
“Humility” (2004), by Sean Topkok, pp. 133–135. 
Building Community: Reforming Math and Science Education in Rural Schools Boyer, Paul. 2006. Building Community: Reforming Math and Science Education in Rural Schools.
Fairbanks: Alaska Native Knowledge Network.
https://uaf.edu/
ankn/publications/pdfs/building_

community.pdf
This report on the National Science Foundation’s Rural Systemic Initiative highlights Indigenous education and schooling in Alaska, Hawaii, Appalachia, Texas, and New Mexico. As well, it provides insights into teaching from a cultural perspective for communities, teachers, administrators, and school boards. It is available as a free download (along with other guides) from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Cross Cultural Center.
Voice of the Drum: Indigenous Education and Culture Neil, Roger, (Ed.).
2000. Voice of the Drum: Indigenous Education and
Culture. Brandon, Manitoba:Kingfisher Publications.
https://files.eric.
ed.gov/fulltext/
ED469143.pdf
This book is the result of an 11-day summer institute—"The Voice of the Drum"—hosted by Brandon University, in 1998. Indigenous Elders from around the globe gathered for an intellectual, spiritual, and cultural communion. The publication is split into four main themes: 1) Worldview, 2) Curriculum Change, 3) Governance and Policies, and 4) Reflections. While each chapter shares valuable insights to Native Ways of Knowing, TASK teachers may especially be interested in the article by Ray Barnhardt, “Teaching/Learning Across Cultures: Strategies for Success” pp. 167–176. The article is available at: https://www.uaf.edu/ankn/publications/collective-works-of-ray-b/Teaching-Learning-Across-Cultures.pdf 
Handbook for Culturally Responsive Science Curriculum. Stephens, Sidney.
2000. Handbook for
Culturally Responsive Science Curriculum. Fairbanks: Alaska Science Consortium.
http://ankn.uaf.
edu/
publications/
handbook/
handbook.pdf
This handbook outlines the concept of culturally responsive science curriculum and explains how to implement it in the classroom. The publication is available as a free download from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Cross Cultural Center.
One Small Square: Seashore Silver, Donald M.
1997. One Small
Square: Seashore. Illustrated
by Patricia J. Wynne. McGraw Hill.
https://www.acorn
naturalists.

com/seashore-one-small-
square-series.html
By Donald M. Silver; illustrated by Patricia J. Wynne This book is part of the One Small Square Series, which teaches children how to closely observe nature using scientific methods. The publisher writes, “Along with habitat descriptions, each book features suggested activities, such as transect studies, that extend learning into the field.” This title is focused on seashore habitats."
One Small Square: Arctic Tundra Silver, Donald M.
1994. One Small Square: Arctic
Tundra. Illustrated
by Patricia J. Wynne. McGraw Hill.
https://www.acorn
naturalists.

com/arctic-tundra-
one-small-square-series.html
By Donald M. Silver; illustrated by Patricia J. Wynne. This book is part of the One Small Square Series, which teaches children how to closely observe nature using scientific methods. The publisher writes, “Along with habitat descriptions, each book features suggested activities, such as transect studies, that extend learning into the field.” This title is focused on the Arctic.
Fighter In Velvet Gloves: Alaska Civil Rights Hero Elizabeth Perarovich Boochever, Annie
and Peratrovich,
Roy Jr. (2019).
Fighter in
Velvet Gloves. Fairbanks: University
of Alaska Press
https://anniebooch
ever.com/books/
fighter-
in-velvet-gloves/
Annie Boochever worked with Elizabeth’s eldest son, Roy Peratrovich Jr., to bring Elizabeth’s story to life in the first book written for young teens on this remarkable Alaska Native woman.