Emergency Management and Planning

The University of Alaska recognizes that it is important to be prepared for emergencies. The Emergency Prepardness Goals of the System Office of Risk Services are to:

  • Ensure the safety and security of the faculty, staff, students and visitors.
  • Minimize disruption of the academic program.
  • Minimize university losses.
  • Maintain university operations and essential services.
  • Assist the community in disaster recovery.

 Below is information concerning the procedures currently in place for each type of emergency scenario.

COVID-19
 

UA EMERGENCY PROCEDURES



Introduction
An active shooter is a person who appears to be actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a populated area; in most cases active shooters use firearm(s) and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims. These situations are dynamic and evolve rapidly, demanding immediate deployment of law enforcement resources to stop the shooting and mitigate harm to innocent victims. This document provides guidance to faculty, staff, and students who may be caught in an active shooter situation, and describes what to expect from responding police officers.

Guidance to faculty, staff, and students
In general, how you respond to an active shooter will be dictated by the specific circumstances of the encounter, bearing in mind there could be more than one shooter involved in the same situation. If you find yourself involved in an active shooter situation, try to remain calm and use these guidelines to help you plan a strategy for survival.

If an active shooter is outside your building or inside the building you are in, you should:
  • Try to remain calm
  • Try to warn other faculty, staff, students and visitors to take immediate shelter
  • Proceed to a room that can be locked or barricaded
  • Lock and barricade doors or windows
  • Turn off lights
  • Close blinds
  • Block windows
  • Turn off radios or other devices that emit sound
  • Keep yourself out of sight and take adequate cover/protection, i.e. concrete walls, thick desks, filing cabinets, or any other object that will stop bullet penetration.
  • Silence cell phones
  • Have ONE person CALL 911 and provide:
    • "I'm at (give your location) and we have an active shooter on campus, gunshots fired."
    • If you were able to see the offender(s), give a description of the persons(s) sex, race, clothing, type of weapon(s), location last seen, direction of travel, and identity - if known.
    • If you observed any victims, give a description of the location and number of victims.
    • If you observed any suspicious devices (improvised explosive devices), provide the location seen and a description.
    • If you heard any explosions, provide a description and location.
  • Wait patiently until a uniformed police officer, or a university official known to you, provides an "all clear".
  • Unfamiliar voices may be an active shooter trying to lure you from safety; do not respond to voice commands until you can verify with certainty that they are being issued by a police officer or university official.
  • Attempts to rescue people should only be attempted if it can be accomplished without further endangering the persons inside a secured area.
  • Depending on circumstances, consideration may also be given to exiting ground floor windows as safely and quietly as possible.
  • If a lock down is implemented, no one will be allowed to enter or leave the building.
If an active shooter enters your office or classroom, you should:
  • Try to remain calm
  • Try not to do anything that will provoke the active shooter
  • If there is no possibility of escape or hiding, only as a last resort when it is imminent that your life is in danger should you make a personal choice to attempt to negotiate with or overpower the assailant(s)
  • CALL 911, if possible, and provide the information listed in the previous guideline
  • If the active shooter(s) leaves the area, barricade the room, or proceed to a safer location
If you are in an outside area and encounter an active shooter, you should:
  • Try to remain calm
  • Move away from the active shooter or the sounds of gunshot(s) and/or explosion(s)
  • Look for appropriate locations for cover/protection, i.e. brick walls, retaining walls, large trees, parked vehicles, or any other object that may stop bullet penetration
  • Try to warn other faculty, staff, students and visitors to take immediate shelter
  • CALL 911 and provide the information listed in the first guideline
What to do if taken hostage
  • Be patient. Time is on your side. Avoid drastic action.
  • The first 45 minutes are the most dangerous. Be alert and follow instructions.
  • Don't speak unless spoken to and then only when necessary.
  • Avoid arguments or appearing hostile. Treat the captor with respect. If you can, establish rapport with the captor. It is probable that the captors do not want to hurt anyone. If medications, first aid, or restroom privileges are needed by anyone, say so.
  • Try to rest. Avoid speculating. Expect the unexpected.
  • Be observant. You may be released or escape. You can help others with your observations.
  • Be prepared to speak with law enforcement personnel on the phone.

No matter what the circumstances, if you decide to flee during an active shooting situation, make sure you have an escape route and plan in mind. Do not attempt to carry anything while fleeing; move quickly, keep your hands visible, and follow the instructions of any police officers you may encounter. Do not attempt to remove injured people; instead, leave wounded victims where they are and notify authorities of their location as soon as possible. Do not try to drive off campus until advised it is safe to do so by police or campus administrators.

The objectives of responding police officers are:
  • Immediately engage or contain the active shooter(s) to stop life threatening behavior
  • Identify threats such as improvised explosive devices
  • Identifying victims to facilitate medical care, interviews and counseling
  • Investigation

Police officers responding to an active shooter are trained to proceed immediately to the area in which shots were last heard in order to stop the shooting as quickly as possible. The first responding officers may be in teams; they may be dressed in normal patrol uniforms, or they may be wearing external ballistic vests and Kevlar helmets or other tactical gear. The officers may be armed with rifles, shotguns or handguns. Regardless of how the police appear or sound, do not be afraid of them. Do exactly as the officers instruct. Put down any bags or packages you may be carrying and keep your hands visible at all times; if instructed to lie down, do so. If you know where the shooter is, tell the officers. The first officers to arrive will not stop to aid injured people. The first responding officers will be focused on stopping the active shooter and creating a safe environment for medical assistance to be brought in to aid the injured. Keep in mind that even once you have escaped to a safer location, the entire area is still a crime scene; police will usually not let anyone leave until the situation is fully under control and all witnesses have been identified and questioned. Until you are released, remain at whatever assembly point authorities designate.

Keep Checking for Updates:

If an active shooter situation develops, the University will implement its emergency response plan and will work with law enforcement to support its their efforts to manage the incident

After the incident:

The effects of such incidents can be very traumatic. The University will arrange for counseling services after such an incident.

UA Pandemic Preparedness Plan

A pandemic influenza is a worldwide outbreak of a new flu virus for which there is little or no immunity (protection). No one can predict when the next pandemic flu will occur or how seer it will be. What is known is that flu pandemics have occurred three times in the last century. The virus spread easily from person-to-person, may cause serious illness and can sweep across the country and round the world in a very short time. A flu pandemic may come and go in waves.

The challenges facing the a multi-campus system, like the University of Alaska, during a pandemic are many and planning a  response to a pandemic event and other infection control and emergency events is an ongoing process. As such, montoring your specific campus (UAA, UAF and UAS) sites will be nessessary. They will be updated in response to updates and changes in the global, national, regional, and campus status of the potential influenza threat. 

The Alaska Statute (AS 18.15.390) defines the authority of the Department of Health and Social Services to address public health disasters. In addition, Alaska Statute 18.15.355-18.15.385 defines the authority of the Department of Health and Social Services to collect and analyze health information, conduct epidemiologic investigations, institute isolation and quarantine measures, and provide appropriate medical treatment.

Alaska Influenza Surveillance Report
This table only represents confirmed H1N1 cases. We know H1N1 novel influenza is circulating in all regions of Alaska and have recently elected to target laboratory testing to focus on identifying the most severely affected persons. Therefore, many cases of H1N1 novel influenza with mild illness will not be identified and do not appear in this data table.

The Bomb Threat Checklist is an orange card that you can hold up to alert your co-workers that you have received a bomb threat. It contains the same questions listed below and can be kept by or under your phone so you're immediately ready in case of an emergency.

If you receive a bomb threat:

  • Check the exact time.
  • Listen carefully to the caller's voice.
  • Write down the caller's exact words.
  • Use the Bomb Threat Checklist.
  • Ask questions, particularly about:
    • location of device,
    • time of detonation, and
    • type of device.
  • Listen for background noises.
  • Note the time the caller hangs up.
  • Hang up the phone. Immediately call 911

CALL 911 and report:

  • Your name.
  • Location and telephone number you are calling from.
  • The situation.
  • Location of the device, if known.
  • Time it is set to detonate, if known.
  • Type of device, if known.
  • Exact time you received the call.
  • Any other information on the Bomb Threat Checklist.

Keeping Updated

Alerts on University of Alaska

Your supervisor, department/college administrator or building coordinator

 

 

Evacuation is required any time a condition exists which would require evacuation, when the fire alarm sounds, when an evacuation announcement is made, or a university official orders you to evacuate.

Know in advance where your designated evacuation point is; this is where you will gather after having exited the building.

Listen to instructions from your evacuation coordinator.

When the building alarm sounds or an evacuation signal is given: remain calm and exit the room.

Quickly shutdown any hazardous operations or processes and render them safe, if it is possible to do so. If an unsafe situation exists that will not allow a shutdown before evacuating, report this to the Evacuation Coordinator.

  • Take jackets or other clothing needed for protection from the weather.
  • Close windows and doors, but do not lock doors as you leave.
  • Leave room lights on.
  • If you are away from your room when the alarm sounds you should exit the building immediately and not return to the room. If an unsafe situation exists in your room, report this to the Evacuation Coordinator.
    • Notify others in the area of the alarm if they did not hear it.
    • Instructors must ensure all students evacuate.
    • Exit the building via the nearest safe exit route. Walk; do not run. Never open doors that feel hot to the touch or attempt to travel through smoke-filled or hazardous areas. Use a different exit.
    • Do not use elevators to exit.
    • Report to the designated evacuation point and Evacuation Coordinator.
    • Wait at evacuation point for directions.
    • Do not reenter the building until emergency staff gives the "all clear" signal.

If you become trapped due to smoke, heat, flames, or some other hazard

  • Leave the room door closed. Seal door cracks and ventilation grills with cloth or wet towels or clothing, if possible.
  • Use the telephone to call 911 and let them know your location. Hang an article of clothing, large enough for emergency responders to see, in or out the window if possible.
  • If smoke enters the room and there is an window that opens, open the window to let it out. Close the window if outside smoke enters. Tie a piece of clothing around your nose and mouth to filter out smoke if needed.
  • Stay close to the floor where the air is cleaner.
Evacuation of persons with disabilities:

Persons with disabilities, including those with mobility, hearing, or visual impairments, may need assistance during an evacuation. Units and instructors need to be aware of employees and students who may have disabilities and ensure they receive assistance during evacuation, if needed. Elevators are not to be used during an evacuation.

  1. Hearing impairments:
    • Gain the person's attention by gesturing or turning the lights on and off.
    • If needed, write a note indicating an evacuation is necessary and provide directions.
  2. Visual impairments:
    • Announce that an evacuation is necessary.
    • Offer your arm for guidance.
    • Tell the person where you are going, and obstacles you encounter.
    • When you reach the evacuation point, ask if further help is needed.
  3. Mobility impairments:
    • Procedure A:
      • If there is NO evidence of fire, smoke or other emergency in the area of occupancy or nearest Area of Evacuation Assistance (AEA), evacuate persons to the nearest AEA.
      • Upon arrival of the fire department, fire department personnel will determine the cause of the emergency and check all AEA locations.
      • If there is an actual emergency, people with mobility impairments will be evacuated by fire department personnel.
    • Procedure B:
      • If there is evidence of fire, smoke or other emergency in the area of occupancy, evacuate all people from the area.
      • Evacuation will be either from the building or to another AEA not affected by the emergency situation.

Keeping Updated

  • Alerts on University of Alaska home page.
  • Your supervisor, department/college administrator or building coordinator.

Business & Academic Continuity of Operations

The Business and Academic Continuity of Operations Planning Program is to document a plan for recovery and resumption of critical functions within your department after an emergency has occurred. This is a tool to be used as a guide to assist you in developing a plan that is effective for your department, and you should feel free to be flexible in creating your individual plan.

  1. Attempt to remove yourself from any danger.
  2. Call 911. Call from a safe location if possible.
  3. If possible, provide the police with the following information:
    • Location of crime
    • Nature of crime and specifics (number of people involved, any weapons, etc.)
    • Any injuries
    • Description of suspect(s) (height, weight, sex, race, clothing, hair color etc.)
    • Direction of travel of suspects
    • Description of any vehicles involved in the crime
    • DO NOT pursue or attempt to detain suspects.

If it is determined that a campus evacuation/closure is necessary, all units will be notified by the emergency personnel or senior administration about the nature of the evacuation/closure, where to evacuate to (usually to home), and when it is safe to return to the campus.

The Evacuation Coordinator will ensure that all occupants are informed of the evacuation/closure and where to go. The Evacuation Coordinator will use the phone list to update and distribute information of the emergency as needed to employees.

Keeping Updated
  1. Attempt to remove yourself from any danger.
  2. Call 911. Call from a safe location if possible.
  3. If possible, provide the police with the following information:
    • Location of crime
    • Nature of crime and specifics (number of people involved, any weapons, etc.)
    • Any injuries
    • Description of suspect(s) (height, weight, sex, race, clothing, hair color etc.)
    • Direction of travel of suspects
    • Description of any vehicles involved in the crime
    • DO NOT pursue or attempt to detain suspects.
  1. Alert people in the immediate area of the fire/explosion and evacuate the area, and call 911.
  2. If you have been trained and it is safe to do so, you may attempt to extinguish a fire with a portable fire extinguisher. If you have not been trained to use a fire extinguisher you must evacuate the area.
  3. Confine the fire by closing doors as you leave the area.
  4. If the automatic fire alarm has not been activated, activate the building fire alarm system by pulling the handle on a manual pull station.
  5. Evacuate the building following the procedures listed above.

Keeping Updated

  • Alerts on University of Alaska home page
  • Your supervisor, department/college administrator or building coordinator.

A release of hazardous materials could involve chemical, biological, or radioactive materials. The ability to respond to a hazardous materials release will depend on many factors, including the amount of material spilled or involved in an incident, the physical, biological and chemical characteristics of the material, the material's health and hazard characteristics, the location of the spill, the level of response training obtained, and the types of personal protective and spill response equipment available.

If a hazardous materials release occurs that cannot be handled by an employee, then:

  1. Alert people in the immediate area of the spill, evacuate the area, and call 911.
  2. If an explosion hazard is present, take care not to create sparks by turning on or off electrical equipment. Activate the electrical shutoff if a laboratory is equipped with one.
  3. Confine the hazard by closing doors as you leave the area.
  4. Use eyewash or safety showers as needed to rinse contamination off people.
  5. Evacuate any nearby rooms that may be affected. If the hazard will affect the entire building evacuate the entire building. If there is a chance of explosion from the hazardous material release do not activate the building fire alarm. Evacuate the building manually by alerting others by voice. Take care not to turn electrical equipment on or off or otherwise cause sparks. If there is no chance of explosion, activate the building fire alarm system by pulling the handle on a manual pull station.
  6. Evacuate the building following the procedures listed in the Evacuation procedure. The Evacuation Coordinator must call 911 to verify the fire alarm/evacuation signal has been received. Be prepared to provide as much information as possible on the hazardous materials released.
  7. At the designated evacuation point, notify emergency responders of the location, nature and size of the spill.
  8. Isolate contaminated persons. Avoid cross-contamination or chemical exposure from contaminated persons.
Securing and Accounting for Hazardous Materials

The use of hazardous materials at the university requires safeguards and increased security. However remote the possibility, we should prevent the unintentional removal of biological agents, radioactive materials, and hazardous chemicals. By using common sense and the following steps, we can greatly reduce the potential for problems:

  1. Do not leave laboratories, or other areas where hazardous materials are present, open and unattended. If you leave the area, make sure the door is locked.
  2. When not in use, return hazardous materials to their proper storage area. Storage areas in unattended spaces should be locked.
  3. Maintain an inventory of hazardous materials and routinely check these materials.
  4. Do not allow unauthorized personnel into your work space. Question people who enter your work space and who are unfamiliar to you.
  5. If you notice any hazardous materials missing or believe they have been stolen, please contact your campus or local police.
 1. What is a lockdown?

A lockdown of a building or group of buildings is an emergency procedure intended to secure and protect occupants who are in the proximity of an immediate threat. This procedure is used when it may be more dangerous to evacuate a building than stay inside. By controlling entry/exit and movement within a facility, emergency personnel are better able to contain and handle any threats. All internal and external doors and windows must be locked or secured. Occupants inside the building(s) are to remain inside their secured rooms and await escort from emergency personnel.

2. What is the role of Faculty and Supervisors during a lockdown?

As with any campus emergency, the expectation of students is that their professor, instructor or supervisor will provide leadership and reassurance throughout the event. It is therefore very important that Faculty and Supervisors familiarize themselves with the lockdown procedures and be prepared to secure their classrooms should it be required.

3. How are individuals notified of the need to lockdown?

There are various communication tools available to alert individuals when there is an emergency on Campus. In accordance with the University’s emergency communication protocol, the method for disseminating emergency alerts will be based on the situation and building(s) affected. Notification may come from a departmental administrator, over a PA or public broadcast system, via electronic signage, by email or directly from emergency personnel. A variety of emergency notification tools will be used to ensure the message is delivered as quickly as possible.

Alerts and updates will be broadcast on the UA website: www.alaska.edu.

4. Do not open the door once it has been secured until emergency personnel are at the door. a) How will I know that it’s not the perpetrator pretending to be a police officer?

Emergency personnel will identify themselves and provide individuals with specific information, such as a password. If a password is used, it will be communicated early in the response and only to the occupants of the affected building(s). For the safety of all involved this password must remain confidential. Emergency personnel will also have identification and keys for all doors. If you have doubt as to the identity of any individual, remain secured inside and request that they open the door.

b) What should I do if an individual inside the room I am in insists on opening the secured door, potentially exposing the other occupants?

Individuals who refuse to follow instructions from emergency personal during a lockdown risk endangering themselves and others. Appealing to the individual’s respect for their own safety and the safety of others is encouraged. In exceptional circumstances, Faculty and Staff may choose actions they deem personally necessary to reduce risks to themselves and others with whom they are locked down.

5. Do not use or hide in washrooms.

Restrooms do not offer a secondary escape. There are no alternate doors or windows. There are few places to hide and noises are often amplified which can bring attention to your location.

6. Do not travel down long corridors.

Unless you are very close to an exit, do not travel down long hallways to get to one. Hallways offer limited areas of refuge should you encounter a threatening individual.

7. Do not assemble in large open areas.

Large open areas, such as cafeterias, generally do not have doors that can be secured and offer limited areas in which to hide. An assailant may intentionally target these areas believing that they can create a larger impact in populated gathering places. If you find yourself in an open area assess your surroundings and proximity to adjacent rooms and exits. Should you need to remain in an open area, attempt to put an obstacle or barrier in front of yourself for protection. If it safe to do so, you may consider relocating if you can access a room that can be secured.

8. Do not call 911 unless you have immediate concern for your safety, the safety of others or feel you have critical information that will assist emergency personnel in the response.

Knowledge of the location or direction of the threat, having credible information on the motivation or intention of the perpetrator(s), or requiring personal emergency assistance would justify a call to 911.

Keep in mind that calling 911 during an emergency has potential to overload the telephone system, thereby creating additional challenges for emergency response personnel and emergency notification systems.

Consider that when you make any telephone call during a lockdown you risk being heard, potentially exposing your location and jeopardizing your safety.

911 Operators will not be able to provide you with additional information on the situation, expected duration of the lockdown or police response.

9. If the fire alarm is activated, remain where you are and wait for further instructions over a PA or portable loudspeaker.

A perpetrator may attempt to have individuals evacuate from their secured rooms by pulling the fire alarm. Emergency personnel will immediately provide instructions to occupants if they are to evacuate or remain secured. Consider your closest exit and an alternate in the event that you are directed to evacuate. Be assured that police would be working with the fire department in evaluating the appropriate response to this type of occurrence.

10. If you encounter or are held hostage by an assailant.

It is important to recognize that every situation is unique and that you must use your own judgment to protect yourself. Try to stay calm, avoid sudden movements and refrain from provoking the individual.

Investigations following recent school shootings have determined that in almost all cases at least one other person was aware of the perpetrator’s intent to do harm. This intent could be expressed by the perpetrator days, weeks or months before the event.

 

In Case of a Medical Emergency

  1. Call 911 or have someone call for you. If someone else calls, have the person report back to you to verify they have called 911.
  2. If it is possible and safe to do so:
    • Protect victim from further injury by removing any persistent threat to the victim. Do not move the victim unnecessarily. Do not delay in obtaining trained medical assistance.
    • Provide first aid until help arrives if you have appropriate training and equipment.
    • Send someone outside to escort emergency responders to the appropriate location.

A pandemic influenza is a worldwide outbreak of a new flu virus for which there is little or no immunity (protection). No one can predict when the next pandemic flu will occur or how seer it will be. What is known is that flu pandemics have occurred three times in the last century. The virus spread easily from person-to-person, may cause serious illness and can sweep across the country and round the world in a very short time. A flu pandemic may come and go in waves.

The challenges facing the a multi-campus system, like the University of Alaska, during a pandemic are many and planning a  response to a pandemic event and other infection control and emergency events is an ongoing process. As such, montoring your specific campus (UAA, UAF and UAS) sites will be nessessary. They will be updated in response to updates and changes in the global, national, regional, and campus status of the potential influenza threat.

UA Pandemic Preparedness Plan

Would you know what to do if a dangerous chemical is released or spilled in your neighborhood or near your work site?

Hazardous chemicals are all around us. They are used in factories and on farms, and are transported on our highways and rail lines. They can be solids, liquids or gases. While some can be seen and smelled, others may be invisible or odor free.

If a hazardous chemical is spilled or released into the air — either accidentally or with criminal intent — you may need to take protective actions until the spill is cleaned up or the gas cloud blows away.

In situations that require sheltering in place, you will be notified by the authorities in your community. You may hear an explosion, see a smoke or vapor cloud, or notice an unusual smell.

Listen to local TV and radio news broadcasts, or your NOAA all-hazards weather radio for instructions. If you are told to shelter in place, take action immediately.

  • Go inside.
  • Close and lock all doors and windows.
  • Shut off any heating or cooling systems and close fireplace dampers.
  • Gather people and pets in your shelter room and seal windows, doors and vents.
  • Keep listening to radio or TV for an "all clear" or further instructions.
 

Although any threatened use of a biological or chemical agent must be treated as though it is real, experience has demonstrated that these are likely to be a hoax However, caution is advised when dealing with any suspicious package or letter.

Common features of suspect packages or letters are:
  • There may be liquid leaking from package.
  • They tend to have hand-applied postage.
  • They have excessive postage.
  • They are addressed to a position, not a person.
  • There may be no return address.
  • They are often hand written or have a poorly typed address.
  • They tend not to be in business format envelopes.
  • There may be misspelling of common words.
  • They may have restrictive markings such as "Confidential", "Personal", etc.
  • They may have excessive weight and/or the feel of a powdery or foreign substance.
  • There may be foreign post marks and/or writing.
  • The source of the letter/package is not recognized by recipient/addressee.
If you believe you have received a suspect package or letter, you should:
  1. NOT open the letter or package.
  2. Contact your campus police.
  3. Remain at the site until police arrive with instructions.

If you inadvertently open a suspect package/letter or if it is leaking liquid or an unknown substance, you should:

  1. Immediately set the item down gently at the location where it was opened.
  2. Contact local Police at 911.
  3. All potentially exposed persons should leave the area and wash exposed skin with soap and water.
  4. Return to an area within the building adjacent to the initial exposure and wait for police (For example, a hallway outside the original room).
  5. Do not allow others into the area. If anyone enters the area, they should stay in the area until instructed to leave by Police.
  6. Remember that this is NOT a medical emergency yet, but it is a potential contamination problem.
  7. This is also a potential crime scene - preserve evidence and pay attention to what you have seen or done.

You should NOT do the following:

  1. Pass the letter or package to others to look at.
  2. Disturb any contents in the letter or package. Handling the letter/package may only spread the substance contained inside and increase the chances of it getting into the air.
  3. Ignore the threat, it must be treated as real until properly evaluated.
  4. Leave the building until instructed to do so.

Guidelines for Screening Suspicious Packages and Letters - Concerns for Explosive Devices

A suspicious package or letter may have any of the features listed above for suspicious packages and letters that may contain biological or chemical materials, including the following:

  • They may have bumps, wires, or pieces of metal exposed.
  • They may be heavy.
  • They may have an excessive amount of securing material, such as tape, string, etc.

If you suspect that a package or letter contains an explosive device, you should:

  1. Not move or open the package or letter.
  2. Not let other people inspect or handle the package or letter.
  3. Immediately evacuate the immediate and surrounding area.
  4. Call 911 from a safe location.

Keeping Updated

 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESOURCES


 State health department now on Twitter, Facebook
To follow the state’s updates, Twitter subscribers can follow Alaska_DHSS. To subscribe to Twitter, go to http://twitter.com/Alaska_DHSS.

On Facebook, find DHSS’s fan page by searching for Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. By clicking the button to become a fan, users will get regular updates in their Facebook news feeds. To subscribe to Facebook, go to http://www.facebook.com.

ALASKA UPDATES on Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management (go to Daily Situation Report)

Alaska Pandemic Influenza Plan (pdf) The Alaska Statute (AS 18.15.390) defines the authority of the Department of Health and Social Services to address public health disasters. In addition, Alaska Statute 18.15.355-18.15.385 defines the authority of the Department of Health and Social Services to collect and analyze health information, conduct epidemiologic investigations, institute isolation and quarantine measures, and provide appropriate medical treatment.

American Red Cross