University of Alaska PRESS

Book Detail

Book Cover

9.5 x 9, x + 104 pages, b&w photos, illustrations, maps, references, index

Format: paper

Price: $16.95

2000

Qayaq

Kayaks of Alaska and Siberia

by Zimmerly, David W.



A well-written, abundantly illustrated, and easy-to-read source of information on traditional kayaks from a broad area of the Arctic sure to be welcomed by the growing number of kayak fans. . . . The book is informative to readers at a variety of comprehension levels. ARCTIC

An excellent introduction to the northern kayaks for kayak enthusiasts as well as students of Alaskan and Siberian aboriginal cultures. PACIFIC NORTHWEST QUARTERLY

An authoritative introduction to the kayak of the north. JOURNAL OF THE WEST

A succinct, authoritative overview of the kayaks of Alaska, the Mackenzie River delta, and Siberia, containing many interesting and informative photos, maps and drawings. PADDLING MAGAZINE

This book represents a major contribution to kayak research- it is without question the most definitive work on the subject. . . . Zimmerly has provided a solid body of research that will be invaluable to those interested in kayak construction, kayak function, and Native history. This new edition is a mandatory book for any shelf of kayak-related reading and is especially welcomed. . . . The author has included an excellent glossary that identifies kayak design features, part names, and construction techniques. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MARITIME HISTORY

This slim volume, originally intended as a catalog in support of the only museum exhibition ever devoted solely to these nimble little craft, offers an accessible review of much of what is known about traditional kayaks. Even though the form has existed with remarkable consistency for at least 2000 years, the skin boats of arctic hunters now constitute an endangered breed; they are resilient at sea but fragile in storage, so perhaps at most 300 original kayaks, decked-over skin vessels with cockpits for individual paddlers, have survived in collections worldwide.

It is author Zimmerly's intent, as he tells readers in the new foreword to this reprint to help us learn from them before they are all gone. Writing from the basis of years of research, he reviews the construction of different kayaks from various regions of Alaska and Siberia, discussing not only techniques and materials in general but the special approaches of individual craftsmen. He shows how vessels' design varied in response to the demands of climate and availability of resources as well as the needs of hunters using them; he considers associated equipment, from paddles to paddlers clothing. The result is a succinct but authoritative introduction to the kayaks of Alaska, the Mackenzie River delta, and Siberia.

Back to Top