Board of Regents

09-24-93minutes

Board of Regents

OFFICIAL MINUTES

Board of Regents' Meeting
September 23-24, 1993
Wood Center Ballroom
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Fairbanks, Alaska

I. The meeting of the Full Board was called to order by President Gagnon at 9:05 a.m., Friday, September 24, 1993.

Regents Present:

Sharon D. Gagnon, President

Virginia W. Breeze, Vice President

Susan A. Stitham, Secretary

Mary Jane Fate

Eric Forrer

Joseph R Henri

Michael P. Kelly

R. Danforth Ogg

Scott A. Otterbacher

Lew Williams, Jr.

Jerome B. Komisar, Executive Officer and President of the University
of Alaska

Regents Absent:

Mark H. Helmericks

In Attendance :

Donald Behrend, Chancellor, University of Alaska Anchorage

Marshall L. Lind, Chancellor, University of Alaska Southeast

Joan K. Wadlow, Chancellor, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Beverly Beeton, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UAA

April Crosby, Assistant to the President

William R. Kauffman, Vice President and General Counsel

Luis Proenza, Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs & Research

Wendy Redman, Vice President for University Relations

Brian Rogers, Vice President for Finance

Gerald V. Neubert, Assistant Vice President and University Architect

'Nanne Myers, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs

Patty Kastelic, Executive Director for Human Resources

Bob Miller, Director of Public Affairs

Mary M. Kauffman, Regents Affairs Officer

II. Adoption of the Agenda

Regent Breeze moved, seconded by Regent Forrer, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents adopts the agenda as presented.

I. Call to Order

II. Adoption of Agenda

III. Approval of Minutes

IV. Comments

A. General Public

B. General Assembly

C. Faculty and Staff

D. Students

E. Alumni

F. University Councils

V. Consent Agenda

A. Academic and Students Affairs

1. Approval of a Bachelor of Arts program in
Japanese Studies

2. Approval of Academic Degree Recipients

B. Finance, Facilities and Land Management

1. Approval of 1994 Advance College Tuition Rates

2. UAF Roof Reconstruction Plan, Phase II - Approval of
Consultant Selection

3. Statewide Programs and Services Butrovich Building, Phase VI - Approval of Consultant Selection

4. UAS Juneau Campus Residence Hall - Approval of
Consultant Selection

5. UAA Heating Systems Renovation - Approval of
Consultant Selection

6. Sale of Former Islands Community College Site in
Sitka, Alaska

C. Committee of the Whole

1. Acceptance of FY95 Operating Budget Request

2. Acceptance of FY95 Capital Budget Request

3. Approval of Regents' Policy 03.03.01 - Governance

4. Amendment to Regents' Policy 04.08.08 - Grievance

5. Renaming of the T. Neil Davis Optical Observatory

VI. New Business

A. Academic and Student Affairs Committee

B. Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee

C. Committee of the Whole

D. Audit Committee

E. Human Resources Committee

VII. Executive Session

VIII. President's and Chancellors' Status Reports

IX. Administrative Status Reports

X. Planned Presentations

A. President's Task Force on Alternative Methods of
Instruction (20 minutes incl. discussion)

B. Rural Alaska Honors Institute

C. University of Alaska Foundation

XI. President's and Regents' Comments

A. Board of Regents' Representative on the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education

B. Comments from President and Regents

XII. Adjourn

This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

III. Approval of Minutes

Regent Breeze moved, seconded by Regent Williams and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the minutes of the August 19-20, 1993 meeting. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

IV. Comments

A. General Public

Dr. Ted Mala, Commissioner of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services and former associate professor at UAA, addressed the Board and expressed concerns relative to the operation of the Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies located at UAA.

Regent Fate thanked Dr. Mala and asked that the Regents be given a report on the Institute at a future meeting, which would include accountability of finance and the program's accomplishments since inception.

Chancellor Behrend agreed that there were many points that needed to be clarified relative to the Institute and welcomed Dr. Mala's interest and help.

In response to a question from Regent Henri, Chancellor Behrend stated that prospects of bettering the Institute were good if realistic programmatic emphases and priorities are set and agreed to by everyone.

President Komisar stated that the opportunities for the Institute for Circumpolar Health are enormous for doing research in health and stated that it is essential that the University move on those opportunities.

President Gagnon asked the University administration to present to the Board a presentation and full report on the Institute for Circumpolar Health at its February meeting in Juneau.

Dr. Brian Saylor, Director of the Alaska Psychiatric Institute and former Deputy Commissioner for the Department of Health and Social Services, spoke to the Board about the opportunities and potential of the Institute in promoting the health of Alaskans.

Mr. Phil Younker, Chair of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce's University Relations Committee, commented on several issues the Committee is working on including a resolution requesting that a part of the Exxon Valdez settlement monies be used for an endowment for several Chairs for the University and suggested the University immediately pursue those funds. He spoke of the Chamber's support of bonding for funding of deferred maintenance. Mr. Younker also expressed the need for additional student housing at UAF.

B. General Assembly

General Assembly President Donna Chantry highlighted some of the Assembly's accomplishments and work since 1988 including credit transfer and the grievance policy. She commended the grievance policy ad-hoc committee for its intensive work. President Chantry thanked Vice President and General Counsel Kauffman and Executive Director for Human Resources Patty Kastelic for their efforts on behalf of the group. She spoke of the Assembly's report entitled "Compensation Methods and Practices: Our Future's Approach" which became the benchmark for the development of compensation methods and practices. The Assembly produced a draft compensation policy which was put into effect along with a rewrite of the personnel policies and University regulations establishing a uniform personnel system. President Chantry stated that over the last few years, the Assembly has focused on job class specifications and career ladders, staff development and training, health care benefits and the Assembly's participation in legislative activities.

C. Faculty and Staff

ACCFT President Ralph McGrath addressed the Board on a number of issues, including faculty workload, the UAA Chancellor Search, and the proposed governance structure as it relates to the May 1992 Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Dr. David Spell, UAF Faculty Senate President, spoke of the Senate's involvement in the development of the new governance structure and also asked the Board's assistance in allowing all faculty to continue to participate regardless of their union status.

Ms. Bonnie Williams, President of the Statewide Administration Assembly, thanked the Board for its support of the new governance structure and said she hoped that through communication and goodwill, union members could continue to participate in shared governance, a participation that had been beneficial in the past.

D. Students

Christopher Delez, President of the UAS student body, expressed his concern for the lack of faculty training in the art of teaching, specifically instructional methods. He also commented on the proposed 5 percent tuition increase included in the FY95 planning assumptions.

Thomas Bunch, a UAF student at Kasitsna Bay Marine Laboratory in Seldovia, expressed his concern about the possible closing of the laboratory. He gave many examples of the courses taught there and the fisheries, teaching and research potential of the facility. Mr. Bunch expressed great concern about the possible loss of funding and asked the Board's support for laboratory funding.

UAF Student Shane Mills expressed his support of the UAF Bachelor of Arts program in Japanese and urged the Board's approval of the proposal.

Heath Hillyer stated his objection to the proposed tuition increase.

On behalf of the students at UAF, ASUAF President Karlin Itchoak congratulated Student Regent Scott Otterbacher on his appointment and stated that the students look forward to working with him during his term. Mr. Itchoak also invited the regents to the 1993 Student Leadership Conference being held at UAF over the weekend. He spoke on several issues including the proposed tuition increase, the Sword and Shield Task Force and gave a status report on the Student Recreation Center.

UAA student government president Kevin Gallagher introduced himself to the Board and spoke about the student government's goals and direction for the coming year.

UAA Student Government Senator Mark Cravens commended Dr. Behrend on the fine job he has done at UAA. He also spoke of the need for a new library at UAA and a shuttle bus service.

UAA Student Government Senator George Culpepper spoke in support of the proposed UAA Academic Center.

UAA Assembly Representative Jack Dalton thanked the Board for its directive to form the Task Force on Tuition and Student Fees which will allow student involvement in future tuition decisions.

E. Alumni

Mr. Layne Thompson thanked Dr. Komisar, Chancellor Wadlow and members of the Board for permitting him to speak. He especially thanked President Gagnon for her consideration, courtesy and compassion shown to people who speak to the Board. Mr. Thompson expressed support of tight planning guidelines for any development on the University campus. He also said that in order to maintain public support for the University of Alaska, the guidelines must provide for full public scrutiny before permitting any commercial development to take place. Mr. Thompson also praised the members of the UAF Master Planning Committee for its outstanding job of formulating the draft guidelines for leasing of UAF campus lands for commercial development in such a short period of time. He urged the Board to provide leadership in advocating long-term development on the campus.

V. Consent Agenda

A. Academic and Students Affairs

The Academic and Students Affairs Committee made the following recommendation:

Approval of Academic Degree Recipients

Regents' Policy 10.01.02 requires annual approval by the Board of Regents of degree and other formal awards conferred in the preceding academic year. An official listing of these awards was available for Regents' inspection at the September 23-24, 1993 Board of Regents meeting.

MOTION

"The Academic and Student Affairs Committee recommends that the Board of Regents approve the list of degree recipients for the summer and fall of 1992 and the spring of 1993. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

Regent Stitham moved, seconded by Regent Breeze and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the list of degree recipients for the summer and fall of 1992 and the spring of 1993. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

B. Finance, Facilities and Land Management

The Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee made the following recommendations:

1. Approval of 1994 Advance College Tuition Rates

In 1991, the Board of Regents established the University of Alaska Advance College Tuition Payment Plan (ACT) pursuant to A.S.14.40.803. Bonnie Williams, the ACT program director, and Jim Lynch, associate vice president for finance, provided a brief presentation on the objectives of the program; the process for purchase and use of prepaid tuition credits; the status of participation in the program; the status of prepaid tuition programs in other states; the status of the university's request for exemption from corporate income tax, donor gift tax, and recipient income tax; and expectations for this year.

The Board of Regents was asked to establish the "purchase price," the "tuition value," and "cash value" of ACT credits for calendar year 1994. The tuition value and cash value are used to calculate the value of qualified redemptions and refunds.

MOTION

"The Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee recommends that in accordance with the terms and conditions of the University of Alaska Advance College Tuition Payment Plan, the Board of Regents hereby establish the following prices and values for ACT tuition credits.

Purchase Price

(effective January 1, 1994) $71.00

Tuition Value

(effective immediately) $63.57

Cash Value

(effective immediately) 1991 - $55.20

1992 - $58.09

1993 - $66.00

This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

2. UAF Roof Reconstruction Plan, Phase II - Approval of Consultant Selection Reference 2

The University of Alaska Fairbanks began a comprehensive long-term roofing program in FY92. This program is directed at the revitalization and continued maintenance of all roofs by the end of FY97.

CONSULTANT SELECTION

In July 1993, the university advertised for proposals from architectural/engineering consultants to provide design services for the roofs identified for resurfacing/replacement in FY94 and FY95. Proposals were submitted by:

Cash Barner User Architects Anchorage, Alaska

Charles Bettisworth and Company, Inc. Fairbanks, Alaska

Design Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska

USKH, Inc. Fairbanks, Alaska

Final interviews were completed September 7, 1993, at the office of Planning and Project Services, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 3691 Cameron Street, Fairbanks, Alaska. Consultant selection was based on a point system. The committee recommends the folowing list of consultants in priority order.

RECOMMENDED CONSULTANT:

1. USKH, Inc. Fairbanks, Alaska

Alternate:

2. Charles Bettisworth and Company, Inc. Fairbanks, Alaska

MOTION

"The Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee recommends that the Board of Regents approve the order of consultants for the University of Alaska Roof Reconstruction Plan, Phase II, projects as presented and authorize the university administration to negotiate and award consultant contracts. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

3. UAA Heating Systems Renovation - Approval of Consultant Selection Reference 5

PROJECT SCOPE

The project scope includes design of a replacement heating boiler for the 24-year-old University of Alaska Anchorage Monserud Building; a replacement heating boiler for the 17-year-old West Campus Central Heating Plant (known as Energy Module 1); and repairs to eight (8), 21-year-old modular heating boilers in the Consortium Library.

FUNDING

The total construction and equipment cost for this work is anticipated to be $510,000.

CONSULTANT SELECTION

Proposals were submitted by:

Coffman Engineers, Inc. Anchorage, Alaska

FPE/Roen Engineers, Inc. Anchorage, Alaska

RSA Engineering, Inc. Anchorage, Alaska

A committee of three, appointed by the director of UAA Facilities Planning & Construction, completed preliminary evaluations. The following firmswere selected and announced at the Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee meeting.

RECOMMENDED CONSULTANT

1. Coffman Engineers Anchorage, Alaska

Alternates

2. RSA Engineering Anchorage, Alaska

3. FPE/Roen Engineers Anchorage, Alaska

MOTION

"The Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee recommends that the Board of Regents approve the consultant selections for the University of Alaska Anchorage Heating Systems Renovation projects as presented and authorize the university administration to negotiate and award consultant contracts. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

4. Sale of Former Islands Community College Site in Sitka, Alaska

The University of Alaska owns a 17-acre parcel of land, located approximately one mile east of downtown Sitka, which includes the former Islands Community College building, a one-story, wood framed, 6,455 square foot building with a net rentable area of 5,455 square feet. A 1993 appraisal valued this property at $1,400,000.

The building has been leased to the Alaska Raptor Center, Inc. (Raptor Center), a non-profit Alaska corporation, since April 1991. The lease expires on December 31, 1993. The Raptor

Center has indicated it will not renew the lease at expiration and has submitted a proposal to purchase the property.

On February 26, 1993, the Board of Regents authorized the administration to publicly offer for sale 6 acres of land and all existing improvements located at the former Islands Community College site.

The subsequent closure of the Sitka Pulp Mill, an unfavorable wetlands determination by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and further market research by the Statewide Office of Land Management suggests that a subdivision of the 17-acre parcel is not feasible, and therefore the entire parcel should be offered for sale.

A public workshop was held in Sitka on August 25, 1993, to discuss the sale of this parcel and to address concerns of the public.

The Statewide Office of Land Management recommends the University sell the entire 17-acre parcel and existing improvements. The parcel will be publicly offered for sale at fair market value for cash or with university financing.

MOTION

"The Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee recommends that the Board of Regents authorize the administration to publicly offer for sale, at fair market value, the entire 17-acre former Islands Community College site in Sitka, Alaska, including existing improvements, and to execute all necessary documents to complete this transaction. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

Regent Henri moved, seconded by Regent Williams, and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the recommendations of the Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee as stated above. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

C. Committee of the Whole

The Committee of the Whole made the following recommendations:

1. Acceptance of FY95 Operating Budget Request

The administration presented its recommendations regarding the FY95 Operating Budget.

MOTION

"The Committee of the Whole recommends that the Board of Regents adopt the FY95 operating budget request as presented in Reference 7. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

2. Acceptance of the FY95 Capital Budget Request

The administration presented its recommendations regarding the FY95 Capital Budget.

MOTION Reference 7

"The Committee of the Whole recommends that the Board of Regents adopt the FY95 capital budget request as presented in Reference 7. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

3. Amendment to Regents' Policy 04.08.08 - Grievance

At the August 1993, meeting of the Board of Regents, the University of Alaska General Assembly advised that it had approved a proposed amendment to the Board of Regents' grievance policy to permit disciplinary action against individuals filing grievances in bad faith. Inasmuch as the administration had not had an opportunity to review the proposal, the matter was deferred.

After consideration of the matter, the administration proposed that the grievance policy be amended to include a section which would permit the grievance council to recommend disciplinary action against persons whom the council determines have filed grievances to harass other employees or have engaged in a pattern of vexatious or repetitive grievances that are determined to be without merit. The proposed change added a new Section X. "Abuse of Process" as stated below and renumbered the existing sections accordingly.

X. Abuse of Process

This procedure is intended to afford employees a meaningful opportunity to resolve disputes within the structures of the University. Its success depends on the good faith efforts of all employees to implement the policy for this purpose. Persons who utilize the procedure to harass other employees or file vexatious or repetitive grievances that are determined to be without merit are subject to disciplinary action. The grievance council shall recommend disciplinary action against persons using the process for other than the intended purpose.

MOTION

"The Committee of the Whole recommends that the Board of Regents amend Board of Regents' Policy 04.08.08 by adding a new Section X. Abuse of Process as contained in the agenda of the Board of Regents' Committee of the Whole meeting of September 23, 1993, and that existing Section X. and subsequent sections of the policy by renumbered accordingly. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

4. Renaming of the Poker Flat Research Range Optical Observatory

In accordance with Regents' Policy 06.01.05, all buildings and their sub-units, streets, parks, recreational areas and plazas on all campuses of the University of Alaska statewide system shall be named by the Board of Regents.

Chancellor Wadlow endorsed a request for a change in name of the T. Neil Davis Optical Observatory.

MOTION

"The Committee of the Whole recommends that the Board of Regents rename the T. Neil Davis Optical Observatory the T. Neil Davis Science Operations Center. This motion is effective September 23, 1993."

Regent Breeze moved, seconded by Regent Otterbacher, and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the recommendations of the Committee of the Whole as stated above. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

VI. New Business

A. Academic and Student Affairs Committee

Approval of a Bachelor of Arts program in Japanese Studies at
UAF
Reference 1

The baccalaureate program in Japanese studies proposed by UAF is designed to produce students knowledgeable about the geography, history, and art culture of Japan; capable of using the language in a professional setting; and possessing a sound career-oriented background to which they may apply this area studies specialty. The proposal was made in response to the desire of students to apply their knowledge of a language in their career.

The program utilizes elements of interdisciplinary area studies which have been well established in university curricula nationwide. Intensive language training and a broad background in Japanese culture are combined with discipline- or career-specific training. Curricula for career options in business and economics or literature and linguistics have been specifically proposed, the former in conjunction with the School of Management. Other options designed by the student with an advisor may be pursued if approved by a program committee.

The program affords an opportunity for more intensive scholarship in a language than is possible in the existing foreign language program, which requires study of two languages. Toward this end, program requirements include a semester abroad experience in Japan, a senior seminar on contemporary Japan, and a research project.

The number of students projected to be attracted to the program, while not large in comparison to other recent program proposals, is to be expected for this type of program. With the exception of the senior seminar, the program will require no additional resources. Provision of the program is in accord with the UA Six-Year Plan and the UAF Strategic Plan, and will provide a definite service to the State with the increasing business and other ties that are being formed with Japan.

Regent Stitham reported that during the Academic and Student Affairs Committee meeting there was an extensive discussion and presentation on the proposed program. Regent Stitham expressed frustration with a lack of systematic process for the approval of programs. She stated that during the meeting, the Committee requested that in December a clear, systematic structure with timelines and a process for the approval of programs be presented by the administration. Regent Stitham suggested the process include a description of what consequences would occur as a result of the addition of a program, whether resources are available to support the program, why the program should be added in times of scarce resources, where the program would be housed and how widely accessible the program would be in terms of alternative methods of instruction.

The Committee decided to proceed with the approval of this program and is expecting a clearly defined process for approval of programs to be presented to the Committee at the December 1-2, 1993, Board of Regents meeting.

Chancellor Wadlow added that one of the reasons the Japanese Studies program is being proposed is that UAF currently has in place the expertise and the courses. Dr. Wadlow said the program received the support of the UAA and UAS campuses.

Regent Stitham moved, seconded by Regent Breeze, and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the bachelor of arts program in Japanese studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

Following presentation of the new business of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee, Vice President Breeze moved, seconded by Regent Henri, and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents goes into executive session in accordance with the provisions of
AS 44.62.310 to discuss matters relating to collective bargaining, litigation and land use, these topics being subjects the immediate knowledge of which would have an adverse effect on the finances of the university. The session shall include members of the Board of Regents, President Komisar, Vice President and General Counsel William Kauffman, and such other university staff members as the President may designate and shall last approximately one hour. Thus, the open session of the Board shall resume in this room at approximately 1-1/2 hours A.D.T. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

The Board went into Executive Session at 12:30 p.m. and returned to public session at 2:30 p.m. at which time Vice President Breeze announced that the Board of Regents just concluded an executive session in accordance with AS 44.62.310 during which it discussed matters relating to collective bargaining, litigation and land use, these topics being subjects the immediate knowledge of which would have an adverse effect on the finances of the university. The session included members of the Board of Regents, President Komisar, Vice President and General Counsel Kauffman and other university staff members designated by the President and lasted approximately two hours.

The Board resumed with new business for the Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee.

B. Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee

1. Statewide Programs and Services Butrovich Building, Phase VI - Approval of Consultant Selection Reference 3

PROJECT SCOPE

The Statewide Programs and Services Butrovich Building has been built and finished in phases as funding has become available. The building was begun in 1985 with the second floor occupied in the fall of 1989. The ground floor will house the Cray Super Computer and is scheduled for completion in September 1993. Phase VI will complete the design of the first floor, finally permitting the facility to be fully occupied. There is approximately 33,000 gross square feet of space on the first floor that will be occupied by several statewide administration departments. Occupancy is scheduled to occur in the spring of 1995.

FUNDING

Funding is from an FY94 direct state appropriation of $6,115,000.

CONSULTANT SELECTION

An RFP was advertised in July 1993 for consultants for Phase VI of this facility. The following firms submitted proposals.

Cash Barner User Architects Anchorage, Alaska

GDM Anchorage, Alaska

C2 Architects Anchorage, Alaska

Design Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska

Final interviews were held on August 2, 1993, at the office of Planning and Project Services. Consultant selection was based on a point system. All four firms were interviewed. On September 2, 1993, Kathleen Schedler, director of Planning and Project Services, determined that one firm was non-responsible. This finding was approved by Charles W. Hill, Chief Procurement Officer for the University of Alaska, on September 10, 1993.

The consultant selections were announced at the Finance, Facilities and Land Mangement Committee meeting on September 23, 1993.

RECOMMENDED CONSULTANT

1. Cash Barner Usher Architects

Alternate

2. GDM

Regent Henri moved, seconded by Regent Williams, and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the ranking of consultants for the Statewide Programs and Services Butrovich Building, Phase VI, as presented and authorizes the University administration to negotiate and award a consultant contract. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

2. UAS Juneau Campus Residence Hall - Approval of Consultant Selection Reference 4

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Enrollment growth at the Juneau campus is being constrained by lack of facilities including insufficient on-campus housing for both single students and students with families. The problem is exacerbated by a rental vacancy rate of less than 1% in the community and the high rental rates that accompany such a low vacancy rate. An informal poll of students who planned to attend UAS in the Fall 1992 semester, but who failed to register for classes, indicated that the majority listed financial pressures and lack of affordable housing as reasons for not enrolling.

The existing housing complex, completed in the Fall of 1985, consists of 50 apartments, each capable of housing four students in either single or double bedrooms. However, 15 of the apartments house single parents or married couples with children. The result is that 155 - 160 students are routinely housed. The current occupancy rate is 99%, which has been typical for the last 3 years.

PROPOSED PROJECT

UAS proposes to develop housing for single students in a residence hall format to accommodate 52 students. This will provide a more traditional housing type which will be well suited to the younger student, which is a growing component of the total UAS enrollment. The younger student can be expected to more easily make the transition from home to campus in a collective type of housing environment, and can later transfer to apartment style living on campus.

The proposed housing type is more efficient and more cost effective than the existing housing type. However, the existing campus food service operation will have to be expanded and the hours extended to accommodate a full meal service program.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The residence hall is anticipated to consist of 26 bedrooms, each housing 2 students. Each pair of bedrooms will share a semi-private bathroom. Bedrooms are anticipated to be 180 net square feet and will be furnished. The facility will also include an office for a resident manager and a communal living room. Other functions such as washers and dryers are available in the existing lodge building. The total floor area is anticipated to be about 10,700 GSF (gross square feet).

A site has been tentatively selected east of the lodge building. An additional 17 new parking spaces will be required under the zoning code. Extension of utilities to the site will require approximately 400-foot runs for power, sewer, water and communications.

FUNDING

The draft FY95 CIP submittal prepared by UAS proposed funding for the project in FY96. An FY94 appropriation to UAS in the amount of $466,200 for planning, design, maintenance and equipment will be used to prepare bid documents for the project. Approximately $110,000 will be dedicated for planning, soils and survey, architecture and engineering, and administration.

CONSULTANT SELECTION

A Request for Proposals was published July 27, 29 and 30, 1993 which identified the scope of work as full architectural and engineering consulting services for the project. Six proposals were received on August 20 and evaluated according to standard practice. Five firms were interviewed by the committee. C2 Architects of Anchorage was not short-listed for further consideration. Final interviews were held on September 14, 1993. The recommended consultants were announced at the Finance, Facilities and Land Management Committee on September 23, 1993. Proposals were submitted by the following firms.

Minch Ritter Voelckers Architects Juneau, Alaska

Jensen Douglas Architects Juneau, Alaska

Cash Barner Usher Architects Anchorage, Alaska

Livingston Sloan Inc. Anchorage, Alaska

Charles Bettisworth & Company Fairbanks, Alaska

C2 Architects Anchorage, Alaska

Regent Fate moved, seconded by Regent Williams, and passed unanimously that:

MOTION

"The Board of Regents approves the list of consultants for the University of Alaska Southeast Juneau Campus Residence Hall as presented and authorizes the university administration to negotiate and award a consultant contract. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

3. Alaska Pacific University Lease with Option to Purchase Real Property

Regent Henri moved, seconded by Regent Forrer, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents, notwithstanding any other provisions of Regents' policy on real property, authorizes and directs the administration to negotiate a lease for the University Lake Building with option to purchase the University Lake Building, the adjacent building, contiguous parking and buffer areas, and the adjacent vacant property, and authorizes the President or Vice President for Finance to execute any and all lease-option agreements, notices of intent to issue reimbursement bonds, financing agreements, and such other documents which university counsel considers necessary for the completion of the transactions, continued university occupancy, and a smooth transition for building occupants. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

4. Carlton Trust Building Purchase

Regent Henri moved, seconded by Regent Kelly, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents authorizes and directs the administration to make an offer and negotiate for the purchase of the Carlton Trust Building, and authorizes the Vice President for Finance to execute any and all documents which administration considers necessary for the purchase and renovation of the building. This motion is effective September 24, 1993."

C. Committee of the Whole

1. Approval of Regents' Policy 03.01.01 - Governance Reference 8

After more than four years of deliberation the General Assembly developed a proposal for a new form of system governance to more closely meet the needs of the University. A draft of this proposal was presented to the Board of Regents as an information item at its August meeting, at which time some of the issues were discussed.

At a retreat in May with President Komisar, members of the General Assembly established that a need exists for faculty, staff, and students to come together with their peers at other campuses. At the same time they wished to provide the opportunity for representatives from these three groups to come together to discuss matters of concern to the University community as a whole. Retreat participants thus recommended the formation of a systemwide council composed of members from all groups as well as three constituent-specific alliances: a systemwide alliance of faculty senates, a separate systemwide classified and APT staff alliance, and a student government alliance or network.

This proposal was presented to President Komisar in August in the form of a replacement for Regents' Policy 03.01.01. At the Assembly's Executive Committee meeting in September, President Komisar proposed a division of the draft into a short policy and an accompanying regulation. The policy would state the Regents' intent that members of the university community participate in the governance of the University and that this participation should be considered an integral part of the University's culture. The policy also would broadly outline the purposes, form, and method of operation of governance groups. Details of governance operation would be set forth in regulation, along with the constitutions of the constituent organizations. The policy and regulation proposals resulting from this meeting were presented in Reference 8, as were charts outlining the old and proposed new structures. The outcome of the review of this proposal by members of the Assembly was presented at the Board meeting in the form of a substitute policy.

Regent Breeze moved, seconded by Regent Stitham, and passed unanimously as amended that:

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents repeals existing Policy 03.01.01 and 03.01.02 and replaces it with new Policy 03.01.01 as presented and amended during the Committee of the Whole meeting of September 23, 1993. This motion is effective July 1, 1994. The administration is directed to work with governance groups on a governance transition process and to report to the Board of Regents in December 1993 on transition efforts.

D. Audit Committee

In the absence of Audit Committee Chair Mark Helmericks, Regent Fate reported on the first meeting of the Audit Committee since its inception and that the Committee approved and adopted the Committee's annual audit plan for FY94.

VIII. President's and Chancellors' Status Reports

President Komisar spoke about the recently concluded conference of Asian and Pan Pacific University Presidents which was held in Alaska. He noted that this was the fourth such meeting of the presidents with the next scheduled meeting to be at the University of British Columbia. He noted that there were two dozen universities from a dozen countries represented at the conference with participants including not only university presidents, but scientists from the universities as well. The principle focus of the group this year was the question of what is happening to the Pacific Ocean and what the universities can do to help with the health of the Pacific Ocean. The issue of the Pacific and the problems associated with the dumping of waste and nuclear materials in the Pacific will be an ongoing issue for coming years.

The President then focused his attention on the recent meeting of Governor Hickel's cabinet which he was invited to attend. He noted that this was a significant opportunity for him to talk about the role of the University in the state, issues of academic quality and areas where the University can potentially increase its services, for example in areas such as health and industrial development. The President indicated that he responded to questions from the group concerning productivity, as well as how the University is managing its lands and intends to deal with dwindling state resources. The president noted that there are a number of very significant issues facing this state, both urban Alaska and rural Alaska, for which the University can serve as a valuable resource and he urged the members of the cabinet to think of the University and its expertise in helping to solve those problems.

UAS

Chancellor Lind reported an enrollment increase for this academic year; spoke of the public forum held relative to the capital move; safety issues, specifically traffic problems; the totem pole raising ceremony scheduled for October 3; and the October 9 planting of 10,000 flower bulbs project; The Chancellor also spoke of a recent workshop, which included participants from private businesses and nonprofit organizations, held to explore ideas about how UAS students may incorporate volunteer work into their academic programs.

UAA

Chancellor Behrend reported on a visit by the Ambassador for Russian States to ACIB and the American Russian Center; the Gala fund-raising dinner to raise funds for the Food Services Technology Program and to celebrate the renovation of the Cuddy Center; announced several personnel changes; spoke of the faculty convocation; announced the WAMI program's receipt of a $20,000 grant from the University of Washington School of Medicine to help recruit Natives in medicine and health careers; announced the receipt of a grant in the amount of $50,000 from CIRI for Native Student Services; spoke of efforts to recruit minority faculty to increase the diversity of UAA faculty; and detailed the percentage of external funding coming to UAA.

UAF

Chancellor Wadlow introduced Dr. Robert Trent, the Dean of the School of Mineral Engineering. The Chancellor stated that Dr. Trent, along with Dr. Akasofu and Dr. Frank Williams, are working together to develop and promote the Alaska Energy Research Center.

Dr. Wadlow then introduced Dr. Ted DeLaca, Director of the Office of Arctic Research, who had just returned from a scientific mission on a U.S. Navy nuclear submarine. Dr. DeLaca reported on the scope of the research, its scientific significance and the future of similar projects.

Chancellor Wadlow then spoke of UAF's fundraising activities and the receipt of a $10,000 anonymous donation designated for the Honors Program; a $5,000 gift for National Merit Scholars from the Skinner Foundation; a $150,000 gift from Cook Inlet Regional Corporation earmarked for research in the School of Mineral Engineering, Rural Alaska Honors Institute and for Rural Student Services; a $150,000 commitment from Odom Corporation earmarked in part for the culinary arts, the School of Management's Business Program and for athletics.

The Chancellor concluded her remarks by updating the Board on UAF's efforts relative to safety matters and also invited everyone to visit the Supercomputer located in the basement of the Butrovich Building.

X. Planned Presentations

A. President's Task Force on Alternative Methods of
Instruction

Chancellor Lind, along with Jim Stricks, Director of the UAF Center for Distance Education and Barry Willis, Director of Statewide Distance Education, were available to answer questions on the Final Report of the President's Task Force on Alternative Methods of Instruction which was distributed at the September 24, 1993, Board of Regents meeting. Chancellor Lind said the President is in the process of appointing members to the Open Learning Cooperative. He said the Cooperative will enable the campuses to work together in an effort to eliminate duplication of course offerings.

President Komisar stated that he accepted with pleasure the recommendations of the Task Force and asked Chancellor Lind to continue his work to provide the support the program deserves.

B. Rural Alaska Honors Institute

The Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a rigorous academic summer college bridge program for qualifying college-bound rural Alaska Native high school juniors and seniors. The Institute was initiated in 1983 at the request of the Alaska Federation of Natives' leadership to work towards improving the retention rate of Alaska Natives in college. Dr. Jim Kowalsky, Director of RAHI, presented an overview of the program and its successes. Associate Vice Chancellor Tom Gaylord made a presentation on the benefits of RAHI in terms of what higher education's responsibilities are and how the program interfaces with the K-12 system.

C. University of Alaska Foundation

University of Alaska Foundation Executive Director Scott Taylor presented an overview of the Foundation, its function and its activities since its creation in 1974.

IX. Administrative Status Reports

Dr. Proenza advised that a written report for Academic Affairs, Finance, Human Resources and University Relations was included in the Board packet and mentioned the attractive article on the Supercomputer that appeared in the latest issue of Alaska Airlines Magazine.

XI. President's and Regents' Comments

A. Board of Regents' Representatives on the Alaska Commission
on Postsecondary Education

Regent Forrer reported on a meeting of the Commission's Budget Committee where the topics of discussion were: costs associated with hiring a new executive director; computer upgrades; and an upcoming move from its present location.

B. Comments from President and Regents

Vice President Breeze stated that she was pleased with the scope and depth of the discussion in the Academic and Student Affairs Committee on program and teacher development and said she looks forward to a report from the administration in December that will speak to the subject of cooperation and outreach between the campuses. Regent Breeze commended April Crosby on her excellent report on plans to proceed with a review on the preparation of teachers.

Regent Stitham requested that the Regents receive a copy of the student newspapers. She also stated that much progress was made at this meeting in addition to the many substantive discussions.

Regent Henri pointed out that the Board and administration have a great deal of work in the months ahead including the productive study, collective bargaining and the relationship of all employees in general. He urged the Board to pursue with vigor and determination the concerns raised relative to the Institute for Circumpolar Health.

Regent Fate thanked the administration for its hard work and the students for their input.

President Gagnon informed the Board of her recent invitation to speak with the faculty at UAF where she stressed the theme of efficiency, unity and excellence. Regent Gagnon also mentioned her invitation to speak to the students during the Student Leadership Conference. She said that she has been asked to speak to the students on the functions of the Board, as well as the Board's expectation of the students.

Regent Otterbacher reminded everyone about the Student Leadership Conference being held through the weekend and invited everyone to attend.

At 4:45 p.m. Regent Williams moved, seconded by Regent Henri, and passed unanimously that the meeting be adjourned.

XII.

Adjourn
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