Board of Regents

04-24-92minutes

Board of Regents

OFFICIAL MINUTES

Board of Regents' Meeting
April 24, 1992
Westmark Baranof Hotel
Juneau, Alaska

Regents Present :

Robert F. Williams, President - arrived at 8:45 a.m.

Morris Thompson, Vice President

Susan A. Stitham, Secretary - arrived at 8:45 a.m.

Mark H. Helmericks, Treasurer

Virginia W. Breeze

Eric Forrer

Sharon D. Gagnon - excused at 3:40 p.m.

Joseph R. Henri

Michael P. Kelly

Tim Lamkin - arrived at 9:05 a.m.

Lew Williams, Jr. - excused at 3:40 p.m.

Jerome B. Komisar, Executive Officer & President of the University of Alaska

In Attendance :

Donald F. Behrend, Chancellor, University of Alaska Anchorage

Joan Wadlow, Chancellor, University of Alaska Fairbanks

George C. Christensen, Vice President for Academic Affairs

William R. Kauffman, Vice President and General Counsel

Brian Rogers, Vice President for Finance

Patty Kastelic, Executive Director, Statewide Human Resources

Jim Lynch, Controller & Associate Vice President for Finance

Helen Anne Myers, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs

Alex Hills, Executive Director, Computer Network

Martin Epstein, Director, Statewide Office of Land Management

Jeannie D. Phillips, Regents' Affairs Officer

Gerald Neubert, Executive Director, SW Facilities Planning

& Construction

Scott Taylor, Executive Director, University Foundation

Michael Rice, Vice Chancellor for Administration, UAF

Beverly Beeton, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UAA

Janice Reynolds, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UAF

Ray Highsmith, President, General Assembly

1. Board Vice President Thompson called the meeting to order at 8:02 a.m. on April 24, 1992.

2. Adoption of the Agenda

Regent Breeze moved, seconded by Regent Forrer and passed unanimously that:

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents adopts the agenda as amended (*).

1. Call to Order

2. Adoption of the Agenda

3. Approval of the Minutes

4. Chancellors' Status Reports

5. Administrative Status Reports

6. Comments

7. Designation of Annual Meeting

8. Executive Session

9. Consent Agenda

a. Academic and Student Affairs Committee

(1) Proposal by the University of Alaska Anchorage to Offer a Certificate and an Associate of Applied Science Degree Program in Early Childhood Development

* (2) Revision of Board of Regents' Policies Regarding Discrimination (added)

b. Academic and Student Affairs Committee Report - Information and Other Items

(1) Report on University of Alaska Southeast Writing Assessment Project

* (2) Proposal to Change the University of Alaska Fairbanks Bachelor of Science in Physical Education to a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science (deleted)

(3) Report on Developmental Education

(4) Report on Alaska Federation of Natives Resolu-tions Pertaining to Higher Education

* (5) College of Rural Alaska (removed from Consent Agenda to 10a)

(6) Report on Quality Review of Programs

(7) Discussion of Issues Common to the Board of Regents and the Board of Education

c. Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee

(1) Approval of Regents' Policies 05.15, 05.16, 06.03, and 09.03 - Student Housing

(2) Amendment to Regents' Policy 05.01.09 - Debt Financing

* (3) Approval of Homer Red Meat Center Lease (tabled)

* (4) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Yup'ik Museum/Consortium Library/ Multipurpose Cultural Center (amended)

(5) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Southeast Egan Library Classroom Wing Addition

(6) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Southeast Soboleff Building Ceramics/ Sculpture Studio Ventilation System

(7) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Duckering Building Fume Hood Upgrade

* (8) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Lola Tilly Commons Roof Replacement Project (amended)

(9) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Gruening Building Fire Alarm Project

* (10) Bond Resolution (added)

* (11) Sale of White River Timber (added)

d. Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee Report - Information and Other Items

(1) Report on Federal Regulations

(2) Golden Valley Electric Association Agreement

(3) Report on MAPTS Lagoon Cleanup

(4) Report on Elvey Building Photo Lab

e. Committee of the Whole

* (1) Tuition (removed from Consent Agenda to Item 10b)

(2) Expanded Investment Options for University of Alaska Pension Plan

* (3) Compensation (amended)

f. Committee of the Whole - Information and Other Items

* 10a. College of Rural Alaska (removed from Consent Agenda Item 9b(5))

* 10b. Tuition (removed from Consent Agenda Item 9e(1))

10c. Report from Board of Regents' Representatives on the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education

11. Regents' and Presidents' Comments

12. Other Items of Concern to the Board of Regents

13. Adjourn

This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

3. Approval of the Minutes

Regent Kelly moved, seconded by Regent Forrer, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the minutes of the February 21, 1992 Board of Regents' meeting; and the minutes of the February 29, 1992 Emergency Board of Regents' meeting. This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

4. Chancellors' Status Reports

Joan Wadlow, chancellor, University of Alaska Fairbanks, reported on recent awards and honors won by UAF students from the National Endowment for the Arts, National Conference of Christians and Jews, National Collegiate Poetry Convocation, NASA, and in the Applied Mathematics Competition; Living History Series lecture by Judge James Fitzgerald; donations from Hubert and Beatrice Wenger; seminars held at UAF regarding academic freedom and educational equity; Doyon House project; appointment of Dr. Michael Rice as vice chancellor for administration at UAF; 75th Anniversary activities including Community Day, a reading by Peter Kalifornsky from his book which has won a National Book Award, and books published by the UA Press including the Aurora Watchers' Handbook; and UAF commencement activities.

Donald F. Behrend, chancellor, University of Alaska Anchorage, reported on program accreditation for the UAA Art Department bachelor degree programs, Paralegal Studies Program accredita-tion by the American Bar Association, and reaccreditation progress for the associate degree in Nursing, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Social Work programs; partnership between Schools of Business and Public Affairs and ARCO on pilot program for short courses on middle management; joint venture between the School of Business and the Anchorage Chamber for a Delphi study on the future of Anchorage; School of Business and OPEC conference on Energy Issues for the 1990s; WISE project status; multicultural-cultural and minority student matters; ACIB television documentary on small business exporting; WAMI entering class composition; fundraising efforts; awards won by UAA including Governor's Safety Media award, and finalist for the EPA Pollution Control & Reduction award; enrollment growth; search for campus president at Prince William Sound Community College; Office of Student Programs award; student demonstration events; Staff Development Day; UAA Hockey Team successes; and the student showcase competition.

5. Administrative Status Reports

George Christensen, vice president for academic affairs, reported on chief academic officer activities including the recent workshop on strengthening academic support systems, coordination between university education departments and the Department of Education to strengthen teacher education programs, promotion of consistency throughout the system, and Holmes Group status; activities taking place within the vocational/technical education programs at the university in establishing effective regulations regarding evaluation, Carl Perkins funds, standards, and quality review of programs status; statistical abstract presentation at the June meeting; and the student demonstration activities at UAF.

6. Comments

A. General Assembly

Ray Highsmith, president, General Assembly, reported on the meeting of the UA Foundation Board; suggested the need for a philosophical model for the future rather than dealing with issues on an ad hoc basis, and for a need-based financial aid package for the university; urged the regents to adhere to Board policy on compensation increases for faculty and staff; encouraged the Board to continue good relations and communications with students as well as with the citizens of the state; and introduced members of the General Assembly executive committee.

B. Alumni

Alan Head, UAF graduate, spoke of his concern regarding dilution of funds to the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Charlie Green, employee at Usibelli Coal Mine and graduate of UAF Mineral Engineering program, stated his concern over the deterioration of buildings and equip-ment, endangerment of accreditation, and serious lack of faculty and funds.

Bart LaBon, UAF School of Management graduate and spokesperson for the Fairbanks Sunrisers Rotary Club, expressed his concern over the declining state of the UAF infrastructure and urged the Board not to lose the system's capital investment by allowing the UAF campus to further deteriorate.

Patty Meritt, UAF graduate and owner of Play N Learn, Inc., asked the Board to establish a long-term plan; and showed photographs of her college-age daughter, grade school age son, and pre-school age son, urging the Board to make it possible for all three of her children to be able to attend a high quality, diverse center of education in Fairbanks.

C. University/College Councils

Tim Tilsworth, president-elect of UAF Faculty Senate, spoke regarding consolidation and reorganization concerns, budget modeling and planning, the stresses on faculty and staff due to the program review process, dismay with the proposed statewide resource allocation model, and planning.

Betsy Boze, president of UAA Faculty Senate, stressed the need to carefully review mission statements that are unrealistic when faced with declining resources, to ensure that salaries remain competitive, and to strengthen the UAA library.

LeRoy Barton, UAA Advisory Council member, praised the regents for their leadership and the direction taken by the university; and urged the Board to continue the trend of dollars following the FTE.

Bing Santamour, Vocational/Technical Education Advisory Council member, spoke against the proposed tuition increase for rural Alaska students.

Dorothy Larson, Rural College Council chairperson and AFN representative, urged the Board to postpone action on the reorganization of the College of Rural Alaska, and to give the Council time to bring forward a plan that has full input from all affected constituents and will strengthen the College and Native education in general.

Gilbert Bane, president of UAA Assembly, thanked the Board for its efforts to be equitable and maintain quality while facing serious revenue decreases and increased needs.

Emma Widmark, member of Cooperative Extension Advisory Council, urged the Board to keep the Cooperative Extension printing shop separate from UAF Printing & Duplicating Services.

D. Faculty and Staff

Nancy Mendenhall, director of the Northwest Campus UAF, spoke in opposition to the plan to restructure the College of Rural Alaska but stated that if it did pass, the rural directors pledged to do their best to carry out implementation; asked that the Board order feasibility studies regarding a separate MAU for the rural sites and a prospectus for a state university.

Betsy Robertson, UAF faculty member, stressed the need for innovative thought and action; the need to attract, hire, and retain excellent students and staff; and implement a strategic plan that will fulfill those objectives.

Don Triplehorn, UAF faculty member, urged the Board not to forget the unique value to academic excellence of a large, resident, research-oriented campus when making deliberations regarding funding.

Lois Hildenbrand, president of the UAF Staff Council, spoke of the Staff Council's support of the consolidations put forward by Chancellor Wadlow and their support for her efforts; and thanked the Board for changing the retroactive bonus increase, should it pass the legislature, to a single allotment.

Merritt Helfferich, Geophysical Institute staff member, praised the efforts of the Fairbanks community in supporting the University of Alaska; and drew attention to a resolution passed by the Board of Regents in 1936 regarding a petition to the United States Congress to establish a research institution at the University of Alaska.

Walt Peterson, welding instructor at the School of Career and Continuing Education, UAF, stressed the need for continuing education at rural sites throughout the state of Alaska.

Carol Hoshiko, vice president of the UAA Assembly, commented on her experiences at the university in the Cooperative Extension Service, CCREE, and UAA; and urged the Board to clarify the mission of the university and its campuses.

Greg Egan, UAF Physical Plant staff member, urged the Board not to let the deterioration of the facilities at UAF continue, and to fully fund deferred maintenance projects.

Bob Grove, chief of operations at the Geophysical Institute, spoke of the high level of research coming from the Institute even though the facility around them is falling apart and stressed the critical need for the research institute facilities physical problems to be corrected.

LaMont Albertson, director of the Kuskokwim Campus UAF, shared his perspectives on the College of Rural Alaska restructuring and his advocating of a separate MAU for the Rural College.

E. Students

Sue Thompson, president of the Associated Students of UAF, thanked the regents for their attention to students concerns regarding tuition, and urged the Board to reconsider the consolidated cap at 12 credits rather than 13; she also thanked the Board for agreeing not to raise tuition further during the 1992-93 academic year.

Jessie Dementieff, student, spoke of the need for better communication with students and the general public; and spoke in support of rural education.

Michelle Parks, president of the Union of Student of UAA, thanked the Board for the support given to UAA; and urged the Board to involve students in budget and planning decisions.

Ted Gardner, Senate president of ASUAF, spoke of the need for better communication between students, legis-lators, faculty and staff, and the general public.

Steve Goldsmith, student representative from Ketchikan Campus, voiced his concern regarding budget cuts and tuition increases at Ketchikan Campus, and emphasized the importance of having small local campuses.

Karlene Limon, UAF biology student, spoke in support of the rural sites, the Cooperative Extension, the Center for Distance Education and urged the Board not to dilute the quality of education in the interior and rural sites. She illustrated her point by distributing Lifesavers, stating that although they are different flavors, they have all been tested and proven successful - our campuses have withstood the same test and should not be destroyed.

Henrik Wessel, president-elect of the Associated Students at UAF, encouraged the Board to maintain the quality of education currently offered at the University of Alaska.

Michael Bott, UAF international student, spoke of the huge lack of responsibility by administrators and the need for students to lobby in order to ensure that their education is continued; he also advocated the abolishment of faculty and staff tuition waivers.

F. Public

Carol Heyman, president of the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce, addressed the Board regarding the Chamber's concerns regarding UAA, and thanked the Board for their hard work and support of UAA and the Anchorage community.

Clifford Berg, president of Berg Construction, asked the Board to reconsider the university's settlement with M-K Construction and its inability to compensate the subcon-tractors who were not paid for work done on the student housing project at UAS.

Phil Yonker, chair of the UAF Committee of Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, spoke of the need for a 20-year plan, and reiterated the Chamber's support for UAF and the UA system.

Jim Doogan, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, reminded regents that the Board is a part of the political body of the state and suggested that the Board president require each Board member to spend one week during the legislative session in Juneau, visiting with legislators and state administrators.

Jim Sampson, Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor and UAF alumnus, advised the Board that there is a strong perception that funds are being shifted away from the UAF campus, the need for a broader-based constituency, and the need to settle the dispute with the ACCFT. He also made a plea not to cut the UAF Rifle Team.

Nels Andersen, Bristol Bay Campus Advisory Council and lobbyist, spoke against the dismantling of the College of Rural Alaska, and asked that a cost benefit analysis study be conducted before any action is taken. He also asked that the Board make a formal apology for the remarks made by Professor Kleinfeld.

Robert Gottstein, member of the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce and chair of the WISE (Winning Is Stronger Education) Program, urged the Board to delay action on the College of Rural Alaska reorganization; and updated the Board on WISE program activities.

Valerie Mundt, resident of Kantishna and Fairbanks, spoke against the proliferation of full campuses at each site and of duplication of programs at every site; and reminded the Board that many of our students are older, site-bound, and seeking degrees for life enhancement.

Bill Robertson, Fairbanks resident and chief of public affairs at the Bureau of Land Management, spoke of the importance of the University of Alaska in many areas of research and applied knowledge, employment of firefighters, and other functions critical to BLM. He encouraged the Board to develop a solid long-term plan.

Pamela Held, chair-elect of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, encouraged the Board to remain focused on the mission of the University and not create division by fostering a competitive atmosphere between the different campuses.

Earl Romans, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, urged the Board to develop short- and long-range plans that are flexible enough to deal with unknown revenue projections; and spoke of his concern that his family will not be able to attend the University of Alaska because of deterioration of facilities and programs.

Art Buswell, former University employee and member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, reminded the Board of their promise to continue the community college mission throughout the University of Alaska system, and urged them to take the leadership in ensuring the university receives a higher share of the state budget.

Ron Ricketts, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, supported the role of the University of Alaska in diversifying the Fairbanks economy to get away from the "habit" of relying on oil money; and emphasized that to be able to continue this role, funds must not be reallocated that will further reduce UAF's ability to fulfill this mission.

Jim Dodson, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce and former alumnus of UAF, pledged his support to lobby legislators for full support of the university in order to maintain the center of excellence that the state has enjoyed for the past 75 years.

Vern Carlson, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, stated his support for UAF and how it has added to the quality of life in Fairbanks; and expressed his deep concern over the deterioration of facilities at the Fairbanks campus.

Buzz Otis, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce and general contractor, pledged his support to the university and urged the Board to be accountable to the general public as trustees of the university system.

Susan Ellis, financial planner consultant and member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, spoke regarding the safety problems on the UAF campus due to severe deferred maintenance, comparing it to a supermarket where when general upkeep is not maintained, the result is a loss of clients.

Billy Brown, director of the North Star Center Corrections facility in Fairbanks, voiced his concern regarding budget cuts and the resulting deferred maintenance problems faced by the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Larry Kelly, member of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, expressed his concern over the dismantling of the university, not utilizing the marketable commodity of our research facilities, and not expanding our distance education capabilities.

Gary Wilken, chair of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, pledged his and the Chamber's support for the University of Alaska Fairbanks and for the system, asking in return that UAF receives equal treatment and its fair share of funding.

Tom Wagner, resident of Juneau and graduate of UAF, addressed the regents on the issue of the College of Rural Alaska, urging the Board to not undermine the strength of the rural college education programs.

7. Designation of Annual Meeting

Policy 01.01.02(F.2) - Board of Regents Bylaws specify that, "In addition to any regular or special meetings of the Board, there shall be an annual meeting of the Board held in June. . . ." Policy 01.01.02(D.2) states that, "At the close of the annual meeting, the officers of the Board of Regents shall be elected by a simple majority vote . . . ."

The Board was asked to designate the June 12, 1992 meeting as its annual meeting in order to hold elections for Board officers.

Regent Kelly moved, seconded by Regent Henri, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents, in accordance with Policy 01.01.02(D.2) and 01.01.02(F.2), designates its June 12, 1992 meeting as its annual meeting for the purpose of electing officers of the Board. This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

8. Executive Session

Regent Stitham moved, seconded by Regent Henri, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents goes into executive session in accordance with the provisions of AS 44.62.310 to discuss matters relating to litigation and real property, these topics being subjects the immediate knowledge of which would have an adverse effect on the finances of the university. The session shall include members of the Board of Regents, President Komisar, Vice President and General Counsel Kauffman, and such other university staff members as the President may designate and shall last approximately one hour. Thus, the open session of the Board shall resume in this room at approximately 1:30 p.m. A.D.T. This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

The Board of Regents went into executive session at 12:45 p.m.

The Board of Regents returned to public session at 1:55 p.m.

Board President Williams announced that the Board of Regents just concluded an executive session in accordance with provisions of AS 44.62.310 lasting approximately one hour and forty minutes in order to discuss matters relating to litigation and real property, these topics being subjects the immediate knowledge of which would have an adverse effect on the finances of the university.

9. Consent Agenda

a. Academic and Student Affairs Committee

(1) Proposal by the University of Alaska Anchorage to Offer a Certificate and an Associate of Applied Science Degree Program in Early Childhood Development

Educational requirements for child care workers have been mandated at the national, state, and local level. Many University of Alaska locations offer classes in partial fulfillment of these requirements, and there are already degree and/or certificate programs in early childhood development or educa-tion in Fairbanks, Juneau, and Bethel. Since the Anchorage area is experiencing a rapid growth in the market for child care providers and UAA is experiencing a correspondingly rapid increase in the demand for its present early childhood development coursework, the university feels there is a need for full certificate and associate of applied science pro-grams in early childhood education to be provided in the region. Many constituents for this program are not readily able to move to other locations in the state to complete the programs because of family and employment obligations in Anchorage. It is antici-pated that 30 to 40 students would enroll the first year, followed by 30 students each succeeding year. Between 15 and 20 students are expected to graduate each year, possibly more at first.

The School of Education at UAA has been working on the present proposal for some time with early childhood development and education faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and University of Alaska Southeast, and with professionals throughout the state. Most of the coursework is transferable to the other programs in the system. This proposal has been approved by the school curriculum committee, the UAA Academic Affairs Board, and the Faculty Senate. The program will begin July 1, 1992.

In the FY93 budget, UAA has requested a new full-time position to bring the number of full-time faculty to two and permit the program to be offered in four semesters. Should this funding not be forthcoming, the complete program would be offered over six semesters by the present faculty, serving fewer students. All other resources, including library support, are adequate to support the program in the immediate future.

Beverly Beeton, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, and Michael Carl, dean of the School of Education, discussed the program with Board members.

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the Certificate and Associate of Applied Science Degree Program in Early Childhood Development at the University of Alaska Anchorage."

(2) Revision of Board of Regents' Policies Regarding Discrimination

Regent Tim Lamkin forwarded a request from a group of University of Alaska Anchorage students that the Board of Regents amend current policies regarding discrimination to include the phrase "sexual orientation." Several students from UAA testified on behalf of this request, stating that action is timely and necessary. Regent Lamkin also requested that action be taken at the August 1992 meeting in Anchorage, to allow students who have proposed this action to participate in the dialog.

PASSED

"The Board of Regents directs the Vice President and General Counsel to incorporate into all University of Alaska policies regarding anti-discrimination the phrase 'sexual orientation,' and to present these drafts for approval at the August 1992 Board meeting."

Regent Stitham moved, seconded by Regent Kelly, and passed unanimously that:

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents approves the recommendations of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee as amended, with the addition of Item 9a(2). This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

b. Academic and Student Affairs Committee Report - Information and Other Items

(1) Report on University of Alaska Southeast Writing Assessment Project

The University of Alaska Southeast is in the third year of a project which assesses a student's writing across the curriculum through portfolio develop-ment. Don Cecil, coordinator of the project, and faculty and students in the program reported on progress since the last report to the Board of Regents in February 1991.

(2) Proposal to Change the University of Alaska Fairbanks Bachelor of Science in Physical Education to a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science

Removed from Agenda

(3) Report on Developmental Education

Walter Ensign, chairperson of the General Assembly's ad hoc committee studying develop-mental education, presented a progress report of the committee's work. Following a preliminary report to the Board in April 1991, the committee has acted upon requests from Board members and from the academic administration to clarify definitions of remedial and developmental education, and distin-guish the pedagogical approach from that of regular college-level courses. A distinction between an underprepared versus an at-risk student was also requested, with an explanation of the difference in the approaches to serve these students. The committee was also asked to identify (or develop the means to identify) which courses offered by the university were developmental courses. In addition, the committee has conducted a preliminary study of the characteristics of students taking certain remedial courses in English and mathematics, which was also presented.

Regent Stitham requested that this report also be sent to members of the state of Alaska Board of Education.

(4) Report on Alaska Federation of Natives Resolutions Pertaining to Higher Education

Dorothy Larson, executive vice president of the Alaska Federation of Natives, discussed the resolu-tions passed at the 1991 Annual Convention of the Alaska Federation of Natives. These resolutions were distributed to the Board at the November 1991 meeting, along with the Final Report on Alaska State Pre-Conference to the White House Conference on Indian Education. The resolutions pertaining to the University of Alaska were provided in the agenda.

(5) College of Rural Alaska

Removed from Consent Agenda to Item 10a

(6) Report on Quality Review of Programs

George Christensen, vice president for academic affairs, reported on progress made toward initiating the review of vocational education programs, the first in the cycle of program reviews requested by the Board of Regents.

(7) Discussion of Issues Common to the Board of Regents and the Board of Education

Regent Susan Stitham reported on the Department of Education's Alaska 2000 project, and on the meeting held in Anchorage on December 13, 1991 between representatives of the Board of Regents and Board of Education.

c. Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee

(1) Approval of Regents' Policies 05.15, 05.16, 06.03 and 09.03 - Student Housing

In 1991 the consultants retained by the university to look at student housing management recommended several changes in Board of Regents' policies and university regulations. The administration reported to the Board on student housing issues at the November 7-8, 1991 meeting. Since that time, campus and statewide financial student services officers have developed the draft policies shown in Reference 5. These policies cover financial issues (05.15 and 05.16), campus planning issues (06.03), and student affairs issues (09.03).

Brian Rogers, vice president for finance, reviewed the policies for the Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee.

PASSED

"The Board of Regents adopts new Regents' Policies 05.15, 05.16, 06.03, and 09.03 regarding student housing issues. This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

(2) Amendment to Regents' Policy 05.01.09 - Debt Financing

On January 30, 1992, the Internal Revenue Service published regulations limiting expenditures which can be considered expended from bond proceeds. These regulations became effective 30 days after publication, March 2, 1992, and contain some very specific requirements for debt financed expendi-tures which are incurred prior to actual issuance of the related bonds.

The impact of these regulations on the university has not yet been determined; however, Jim Lynch, controller and associate vice president for finance, issued a "protective declaration" regarding the issuance of bonds for the Cooks Corner Building acquisition, Plywood Supply Building acquisition, power plant chiller project, power plant condenser project, and the UAF Student Center construction. The protective declaration is intended to qualify expenditures made to date on these projects as expenditures from bond proceeds.

On March 9, 1992, bond counsel for the university (Wohlforth, Argetsinger, Johnson & Brecht) recommended that the Board of Regents immed-iately adopt the required resolutions or authorize a university official to make such declarations on behalf of the Board. Since the importance, frequency, and urgency of these declarations are not clearly known at this time and may require modifica-tion, the President recommended that the vice president for finance be authorized to make such declarations on behalf of the Board.

PASSED

"The Board of Regents amends Regents' Policy 05.01.09 regarding issuance of debt by adding the following paragraph.

F. Reimbursement Bonds

For each bond issue considered to be "Reimbursement Bonds" under Internal Revenue Service Regulations, the vice president for finance or the vice president's designee shall issue, on behalf of the Board of Regents, a declara-tion of official intent to issue bonds for reimbursement of capital expenditures paid prior to the date on which the bonds will be sold or delivered. Such declaration must: state that the declara-tion is being made pursuant to Section 1.103-18 of the Internal Revenue Service Regulations; contain a functional descrip-tion of the property, project or program to be financed; identify the maximum principal amount of the Reimbursement Bonds expected to be issued; be made prior to payment of qualifying expendi-tures, except for preliminary architec-tural and engineering charges; and be posted for public inspection at the regional Facilities Planning and Con-struction office within 30 days of the declaration through the date of delivery of the Reimbursement Bonds.

This motion is effective retroactive to March 2, 1992."

(3) Approval of Homer Red Meat Center Lease

The University of Alaska owns approximately 949 acres of land in Homer, Alaska. Eighty acres of this, commonly known as the Homer Red Meat Center, located at Mile 8 of East End Road, was acquired by the University in 1972 in fee simple title. The university owns agricultural rights only to 789 acres. The remaining 80 acre parcel is original grant land owned in fee simple title.

Efforts by the Statewide Office of Land Management (SOLM) to lease and/or sell the property have been unsuccessful and the facilities are currently being managed by a caretaker. Without the necessary funds to properly maintain the property, many of the buildings are now deteriorating. Current gross revenue is $625 per month, including $225 for grazing rights paid by a local rancher whose use is based on a short-term permit, and $400 in rent paid by the caretaker.

The property's highest and best use is as a ranch. An individual in Homer has expressed interest in a 10-year lease of the Center with an option to purchase after the first two years at $630,000, or the then current fair market value, whichever is greater. He has been ranching in the Homer area for many years, and has a good reputation. In addition to paying fair market value, the lessee will be responsible for all maintenance, insurance, taxes and for developing the property according to a university-approved development plan. SOLM proposed to publicly advertise the property, and requested Board approval in order to include an option to sell this property.

The Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee recommended that the Board of Regents table action on this item until the following information was received from SOLM: schematics, chronology of the Center, prior attempts to sell the property, and whether it is possible to lease with a no-sale option.

TABLED

"The Board of Regents authorizes the administration to offer the Homer Red Meat Center for lease with an option to sell and to execute all agreements necessary to complete this transaction."

(4) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Yup'ik Museum/ Consortium Library/Multipurpose Cultural Center

The University of Alaska Fairbanks Yup'ik Museum/ Consortium Library/Multipurpose Cultural Center project will provide a new building of approximately 18,500 gross square feet. Part of the facility will be joint-use space with the university. The facility will be located adjacent to the University of Alaska Fairbanks Kuskokwim Campus in Bethel, Alaska.

The site was chosen after extensive review of soil conditions, land ownership and future development plans for the campus. The city of Bethel agreed to provide land for this site at market value for the building footprint only, but the cost will be offset by an agreement to use some university land for development of a joint-use parking area.

The museum portion of the building will provide for the preservation and display of collections and artifacts from the Yup'ik culture. The library area will provide the needed space for the City of Bethel-University Consortium Library, allowing for growth and better utilization of the collection.

The cultural center area will provide a large multipurpose room with provisions for a kitchenette area and stage. The multipurpose room will be capable of being divided into several smaller rooms accommodating simultaneous use by small groups or classes.

Funding for this project is from a $5.0 million FY91 capital appropriation, as well as a $1.0 million FY90 appropriation to the Association of Village Council Presidents. The Board of Regents approved the consultant selection for this project at its February 1991 meeting. Site plans and schematic designs were hand-carried to the April 23-24, 1992 Board of Regents' meeting.

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the schematic design of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Yup'ik Museum/ Consortium Library/ Multipurpose Cultural Center project as presented and authorizes the university administration to bid and award a construction contract within available funding, with no construction to begin until operating and joint-use agreements are approved and the land title transferred to the University of Alaska."

(5) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Southeast Egan Library Classroom Wing Addition

PROJECT SCOPE

The design of the Egan Library encompassed conceptual design of a much larger complex, includ-ing a visual arts wing, music wing, recital hall, and black box theater. All of these program elements were to be connected by a central circulation spine that was intended to also serve as lobby space for the performing facilities. The library itself is the only part of the complex that has been constructed.

Since the original plan for the complex was developed in 1982, the priorities for developing new space on the campus have changed. The campus now needs general assignment classroom space. The visual arts wing has been eliminated and in its place the campus proposed to construct a two-level classroom wing. The master plan for the complex, however, is largely unchanged and future develop-ment options are not affected by this program change.

The classroom wing addition provides 16 general assignment classroom spaces ranging in size from a 154-seat lecture hall to a pair of 295-square-foot seminar rooms that will each seat 12 students. Ancillary spaces, including storage and public toilets, are also included. There are no faculty offices in the addition. The lower level encloses 9,950 gross square feet, the main level encloses 11,140 gross square feet, and the third-level mechanical room is 1,500 gross square feet. The total floor area of the addition is 22,590 gross square feet.

The classroom wing addition joins the existing building at the exterior concrete stairs which will be enclosed as part of the new construction work. The Egan Library lower and main floor levels will align with the floor levels of the addition. The addition will utilize the same materials and architectural details as the library. The concrete framed arcade, metal window trim, and timber mullions will all reflect the original design. The project also includes a 63-car expansion of the exiting parking lots.

Design work is being performed by Jensen Douglas Architects of Juneau in association with BOORA Architects of Portland, Oregon, the same design team that worked on the original project. The FP&C project manager is Jack Wolever.

FUNDING SOURCE

The project budget is $6,046,000, and the construction budget is $4,534,000. The current cost estimate is $4,327,000, including parking expansion. The design effort for this project is funded from an FY92 capital appropriation to the Juneau campus for academic and administrative space repairs, renovation, planning, and design in the amount of $850,000, of which approximately $350,000 was designated for preparation of bid documents for the classroom wing addition project.

Construction funds have been requested as part of the FY93 University of Alaska Capital Improvement Program in the amount of $6,046,000, as noted above. The project is ranked as the number 1 priority for UAS and the number 11 priority for the university system in FY93.

SCHEDULE

Construction Funding July 1, 1992

Advertise for Bid July 6, 1992

Open Bids August 5, 1992

Construction Completion September 1, 1993

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the schematic design of the University of Alaska Southeast Egan Library Classroom Wing Addition project as presented and authorizes the university administration to bid and award a construction contract within available funding, subject to an appropriation from the Alaska Legislature."

(6) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Southeast Soboleff Building Ceramics/Sculpture Studio Ventilation System

PROJECT SCOPE

The existing ceramics/sculpture studio in the Soboleff Building consists of 940 square feet open lab space, a 130 square foot kiln room, and a 130 square foot clay mixing room. In the open lab are tables, a sink, shelving, and potters' wheels for ceramics, and a work table and band saw for sculpture. The kiln room houses three electric kilns. The clay mixing room provides space for a pug mill, clay storage, and a small workbench.

The studio is supplied with air for heating and ventilation by a fan system that serves the entire building. Air is returned from the studio via a common ceiling plenum back to the fan system, mixed with a percentage of outside air, and recirculated through the building again. The only special provision for ventilating the studio is a small exhaust fan on a time clock in the kiln room for venting accumulated heat during the firing cycle.

Building condition surveys by Facilities Planning and Construction identified a potential air quality problem in the studio. Clay dust is prevalent in the studio. Silica, found in clays, is a potential source of lung disease when inhaled regularly. Certain glazes contain known or suspected carcinogens. During firing, kilns emit noxious gases such as sulfur oxides and carbon monoxide. Asbestos is a frequent contaminant in soapstone.

The proposed project involves extending studio perimeter walls to the structural deck above to separate the studio ceiling space from the return air plenum serving the rest of the floor. Ventilation ducts serving the studio will be capped. A 300 square foot addition to the building will be constructed to house a separate ventilating system for the studio. The proposed system design is relatively simple and modest.

The ventilation system will consist of supply ducts providing heat and ventilation air to the studio from a new supply fan fitted with a coil and filters. Air will be exhausted from the studio from a two-speed hood over the sculpture workbench. A separate dust pickup will be fitted to the adjacent band saw. An independent exhaust hood will vent the kiln room only during firing, and another exhaust hood will vent the clay mixing room during mixing operations. All exhaust air will be ducted to the roof. There will be no recirculation of studio air.

Since any ventilation system will not, of itself, solve air quality problems in the studio, a strict operating program for the studio will be implemented to address use of respirators, storage of dry clay, daily housekeeping requirements, and the limitations on use of certain glazes and stone.

Design work is being performed by Minch Ritter Voelckers Architects of Juneau under a term contract authorization. The FP&C project manager is Jack Wolever.

FUNDING SOURCE

This project has been identified by Chancellor Marshall Lind as his highest priority for remodeling and health and safety related improvements. The total project budget is $245,000, and the construc-tion budget is $180,000. This project will use the entire $250,000 FY92 capital appropriation to UAS for repairs, renovation, and deferred maintenance.

SCHEDULE

Advertise for Bids April 29, 1992

Open Bids May 21, 1992

Construction Completion October 1, 1992

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the schematic design of the University of Alaska Southeast Soboleff Building Ceramics/ Sculpture Studio Ventilation System project as presented and authorizes the university administration to bid and award a construction contract within available funding."

(7) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Duckering Building Fume Hood Upgrade

PROJECT SCOPE

Twenty fume hoods serve sixteen teaching and research laboratories located in older wings of the Duckering Building. Existing fume hoods include radioactive hoods, as well as "standard" hoods. Recent detailed inspections have identified deficien-cies in many of the fume hood systems, including dangerously inadequate velocities of air across the opening of the hoods.

This project will correct the following:

1. Complete replacement of nine fume hood systems, including variable air volume controls and stainless steel exhaust stacks extended to appropriate discharge elevations above the roof;

2. Extension of five exhaust stacks with stainless steel stacks to appropriate discharge eleva-tions;

3. Balance five exhaust air fans to achieve velocities across the openings of the required velocity of 100 feet per minute; and

4. Rehabilitate and expand the heating ventilation and air conditioning system to provide for adequate makeup air as required by codes governing laboratories, and to allow the fume hoods to function properly.

All design and construction is based on basic safety and engineering standards of fume hood function requiring operating face velocities of 100 feet per minute (fpm) and variable air volume (VAV) to reduce entrainment of contaminants into the work space and conservation of energy.

CONSULTANT

The architectural consultant for this project is USKH of Fairbanks, Alaska. The Board of Regents approved this selection at its August 17, 1990 meeting.

FUNDING SOURCE

The project is funded by two direct appropriations in the FY91 and FY92 budget.

PROJECT SCHEDULE

Design May 1992

Advertise for Bids June 1992

Construction August-September 1992

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the schematic design of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Duckering Building Fume Hood Upgrade project as presented and authorizes the university administration to bid and award a construction contract within available funding."

(8) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Lola Tilly Commons Roof Replacement Project

PROJECT SCOPE

Lola Tilly Commons is under approximately 19,000 square feet (SF) of roof, consisting of two distinctly different roofing systems. The lower roof (14,500 SF) was originally designed, constructed, and utilized as a rooftop plaza, and as such was the site of numerous social and academic functions. The current roof was a temporary fix by in-house roofers, but the lower roof has no insulation. This results in increased heating costs; damage to interior ceiling tiles, carpet and other finishes from condensation on the underside of the roof deck; and risk of freeze-up of sprinklers and water lines.

The upper roof (4,500 SF) was designed as a "suspended" roof structure, supported from above by steel beams. The beams limit the existing insulation to 2 1/2 inches with an R-value of R-9. The existing built-up roof (BUR) is in poor condition, the insula-tion is damp in some areas, and leaks have damaged ceiling tiles below.

The lower roof will be reconstructed with the installation of a single-ply EPDM inverted membrane roof assembly (IRMA) plaza deck. The roofing system will consist of a single 45 mil EPDM sheet, overlain with six inches of styrofoam insulation (R-30.0), capped with heavy pavers suitable for a walking surface. Perimeter guardrails would be added per code so that the roof can be used for public functions.

The upper roofing system will be removed down to the existing structural deck, and a new smooth four-ply, built-up roof installed. The roofing system will include a new vapor barrier, insulation (2 1/2 inches; R-15.6) and smooth roofing overcoated with a reflective aluminum fibrated emulsion. Polyisocya-nurate insulation will be utilized because this type of insulation has the highest R-value per inch, which is critical because of the thickness of insulation is restricted by the structural beam elevation. Consid-eration was given to erecting a completely new roof substrate on top of the exposed roof beams; the added expense of this system ($80,000) made it prohibitive.

CONSULTANT

The architectural consultant for this project is USKH of Fairbanks, Alaska. The Board of Regents approved this selection at its August 17, 1991 meeting.

FUNDING SOURCE

The project is funded by FY92 repair, renovation and deferred maintenance funds.

PROJECT SCHEDULE

Design May 1992

Advertise for Bids June 1992

Construction August 1992

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents approves the schematic design of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Lola Tilly Commons Roof Replacement project as presented provided that the administration shall analyze the feasibility of further improvements to the upper roof, and authorizes the university administration to bid and award a construction contract within available funding."

(9) Approval of Schematic Design and Authority to Bid and Award a Contract - University of Alaska Fairbanks Gruening Building Fire Alarm Project

BACKGROUND

The Gruening Building fire alarm system has been unreliable for several years. It was installed in 1973 and no longer meets code requirements or functions properly. The bells are on an AC series loop causing all annunciation to cease if the circuit is broken in any one location. A paralleled zoned system is now mandatory.

Each floor has only two (2) bells, and those are misplaced or enclosed behind walls or partitions due to numerous remodeling upgrades. Audibility is not consistent. The ungrounded smoke detectors are not located properly and frequently malfunction, which causes false alarms. Required duct smoke detectors are absent.

The newly installed sprinkler flow switches and tamper switches are not tied into the system for fear of overload or additional false signals being sent. Replacement parts are no longer available for this nineteen-year old system. A new system is required for code compliance and safety.

PROJECT SCOPE

The University of Alaska Fairbanks Gruening Building Fire Alarm project will provide for the expansion and upgrade of the fire alarm system for the Gruening Building located on the UAF campus. The project will provide for new equipment to include: a new fire alarm panel, a remote annunciator panel, strobe and horn strobe annunciating devices, pull stations and code required ionization, and heat detectors. The new system will be compatible with and will re-use the existing magnetic door holders. The fire alarm system will provide coverage throughout the facility. The new system will meet the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements and provide fire alarm coverage required by adopted uniform codes.

CONSULTANT

The engineering consultant for this project is Design Alaska, Inc., of Fairbanks, Alaska. Design Alaska, Inc., was selected through the standard Facilities Planning and Construction procedures. Design Alaska's project manager is electrical engineer Bob Gras, P.E.

FUNDING SOURCE

Design and construction services for the Gruening Building Fire Alarm project are funded by two appropriations. An FY91 direct appropriation for UAF campuswide fire alarm corrections (Account No. 546357) and an FY92 appropriation for fire alarm replacement (Account No. 548187).

PROJECT SCHEDULE

The Gruening Fire Alarm project will proceed on the following schedule:

Board of Regents' Approval April 24, 1992

Construction Documents Complete April 29, 1992

Bid Opening May 26, 1992

Construction Complete September 28, 1992

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the schematic design of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Gruening Building Fire Alarm project as presented and authorizes the university administration to bid and award a construction contract within available funding."

(10) Bond Resolution

The administration has been working with the university's bond counsel (Wohlforth, Argetsinger, Johnson & Brecht) and its financing consultant (Public Financial Management, Inc.) to initiate two financing packages for these projects. One package will consist of the UAF student recreation center, which will be secured by a pledge of the revenues from the facility and a junior lien on other revenues of the university. The second package will cover the costs of the Cooks Corner Building acquisition, the Plywood Supply Building acquisition, the power plant chiller project, and completion of the power plant condenser project. This package will be secured by a pledge of all general revenues of the university.

Brian Rogers, vice president for finance, provided an update on the status of each of the projects and the financing packages.

The following resolution was brought forward for adoption:

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA BOARD OF REGENTS
RESOLUTION NO. 1

RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF NOT TO EXCEED $10,000,000 PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA GENERAL REVENUE BONDS, 1992 SERIES A AND NOT TO EXCEED $7,000,000 PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA GENERAL REVENUE BONDS, 1992 SERIES B; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A TRUST INDENTURE AND OTHER NECESSARY FINANCING DOCUMENTS FOR THE BONDS; AND AUTHORIZING AND APPROVING RELATED MATTERS.

WHEREAS, the University of Alaska (the "University") is authorized pursuant to Alaska Statutes Chapter 14.40, as amended (the "Act") to issue revenue bonds to pay the cost of acquiring, constructing or equipping a facility that the Board of Regents of the University determines is necessary: and

WHEREAS, the University has determined to issue not to exceed $10,000,000 University of Alaska General Revenue Bonds, 1992 Series A, and not to exceed $7,000,000.00 University of alaska General Revenue Bonds, 1992 Series B, as hereinafter described (the "Bonds") for the purpose of paying the cost of acquiring, constructing, or equipping the facilities described in Exhibit A hereto (the "Projects"); and

WHEREAS, the Bonds will be issued under and pursuant to and are being secured by a Trust Indenture to be dated as of May 15, 1992 (the "Indenture"), and Supplemental Indentures to be dated as of May 15, 1992 (the "Supplemental Indentures"), which respectively shall be in substantially the form outlined in Exhibit B hereto entitled "Executive Summary"; and

WHEREAS, provisions have been made for the sale of the Bonds to John Nuveen & Co. Incorporated (the "Underwriter") pursuant to a Bond Purchase Agreement to be negotiated between the Underwriter and the University; and

WHEREAS, other financing documents will be necessary to the sale, issuance and delivery of the Bonds.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA AS FOLLOWS:

Section 1. The issuance of the General Revenue Bonds, 1992 Series A in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $10,000,000, and the issuance of the General Revenue Bonds, 1992 Series B in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $7,000,000, be, and the same hereby is, in all respects authorized, approved and confirmed.

Section 2. The General Revenue Bonds, 1992 Series A shall be dated as of May 15, 1992, and shall mature on or have sinking fund installments due on October 1 in each of the years 1993 through 2007 in a principal amount in each such year not exceeding $900,000. The General Revenue Bonds, 1992 Series B shall be dated as of May 15, 1992, and shall mature on or have sinking fund installments due on October 1 in each of the years 1993 through 2017 in a principal amount in each such year not exceeding $700,000.

The exact principal amounts of each maturity or the exact amount of each sinking fund installment of the Bonds of each Series, and the interest rates on the Bonds of each Series, shall be fixed and determined by the President, the Vice President for Finance or3 the Associate Vice President for Finance at the time of execution of the Contract of Purchase pursuant to Section 4 hereof.

Section 3. The President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University be, and each of them hereby is, authorized, empowered and directed to approve of behalf of the University the final form of the Indenture and the Supplemental Indentures in the respective forms outlined in Exhibit B hereto, but with such changes, modifications, additions, and deletions therein as shall to them seem necessary, desirable or appropriate, the execution thereof to constitute conclusive evidence of their approval of any and all changes, modifications, additions or deletions from the outlines of said documents in Exhibit B, and after the execution and delivery of the Indenture and the Supplemental Indentures, each of the President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University is hereby authorized, empowered and directed to do all such acts and things and to execute all such documents as may be necessary or convenient to carry out and comply with the provisions of said documents as executed.

Section 4. The President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University each is hereby authorized to execute the Contract of Purchase on behalf of the University providing for the sale of the Bonds to the Underwriter, provided that the true interest cost expressed as a percentage payable on the Bonds shall not exceed 8.0% per annum. The Bonds shall otherwise be sold as provided for in said Contract of Purchase.

Section 5. The President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the university each is hereby authorized to execute the Preliminary Official Statement for the Bonds, and, on behalf of the University, to deem the Preliminary Official Statement "final" as of its date for purposes of Security and Exchange Commission Rule 15c2-12(b)(1). Each of the President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University be, and each of them hereby is, authorized, empowered and directed to approve and execute the final form of the Official Statement for the Bonds, with such changes from the form of the Preliminary Official Statement as the President, the Vice President for Finance or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University considers necessary or appropriate to fully disclose to purchasers of the Bonds all pertinent information relating thereto. The distribution of the Preliminary Official Statement and the Official Statement, as approved by the President, the Vice President for Finance or the Associate Vice President for Finance, in connection with the offering of the Bonds is hereby ratified, confirmed and approved.

Section 6. Each of the President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University is authorized to accept on behalf of the University a commitment to provide one or more letters of credit or policies of municipal bond insurance for a portion or all of the Bonds upon determining that, treating the fees or premiums for such letters or credit or policies of municipal bond insurance as additional interest on the Bonds, the letters of credit or policies of municipal bond insurance would reduce the Bonds' true interest cost.

Section 7. Each of the President, the Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University of hereby authorized to have the Bonds prepared and to execute and authorize the delivery of the Bonds to the purchasers thereof upon receipt of the purchase price therefor upon receipt of the purchase price therefor plus accrued interest, if any, and to do and perform all acts and things and execute any and all documents in the name of the University necessary, useful or convenient to the issuance and sale of the Bonds by the University.

Section 8. This Resolution will take effect immediately.

DATED at Juneau, Alaska, this 24th day of April, 1992

EXHIBIT A Projects

Estimated Cost

1. 1992 Series A Bonds:

Cook's Corner Building Acquisition $3,200,000.00

Plywood Supply Building Acquisition 3,800,000.00

Power Plant Cooler/Chiller Project 940,000.00

Power Plant Air Cooled Condenser

Project 800,000.00

2. 1992 Series B Bonds: UAF Student Recreation Center $6,000,000.00

EXHIBIT B Executive Summary
THE TRUST INDENTURE CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS AND PROVISIONS:

Preambles

ARTICLE I DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATION

Section 101 Definitions

Section 102 Interpretation

Section 103 Successors and Assigns

Section 104 Parties Interested Herein

ARTICLE II AUTHORIZATION AND ISSUANCE OF BONDS

Section 201 Authorization of Bonds

Section 202 Provisions for Issuance of Bonds

Section 203 1992 Bonds

Section 204 Additional Bonds

Section 205 Provisions for Refunding Bonds

ARTICLE III GENERAL TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF BONDS

Section 301 Medium of Payment, Denomination, Maturities, Form and Date

Section 302 Legends

Section 303 Execution and Authentication

Section 304 Exchange of Bonds

Section 305 Negotiability, Transfer and Registry

Section 306 Regulations with Respect to Exchanges and Transfers

Section 307 Bonds Mutilated, Destroyed, Stolen or Lost

Section 308 Preparation of Definitive Bonds; Temporary Bonds

Section 309 Cancellation and Destruction of Bonds

Section 310 Alternate Terms Permitted in Supplemental Indentures

ARTICLE IV REDEMPTION OF BONDS

Section 401 Privilege of Redemption and Redemption Price

Section 402 Redemption at the Election or Direction of the University

Section 403 Redemption Otherwise Than at the University's Election or Direction

Section 404 Selection of Bonds to be Redeemed

Section 405 Notice of Redemption

Section 406 Payment of Redeemed Bonds

ARTICLE V ESTABLISHMENT OF FUNDS AND APPLICATION THEREOF

Section 501 Pledge of Revenues and Other Funds

Section 502 Establishment of Funds and Accounts

Section 503 Construction Fund

Section 504 Revenues and Revenue Fund

Section 505 Payments Into Certain Funds

Section 506 Debt Service Fund

Section 507 Reserve Fund

Section 508 Excess Investment Earnings Fund

ARTICLE VI DEPOSITORIES OF MONEYS, SECURITY FOR DEPOSITS AND INVESTMENT OF FUNDS

Section 601 Depositories

Section 602 Deposits

Section 603 Investment of Certain Funds

Section 604 Valuation and Sale of Investments

ARTICLE VII PARTICULAR COVENANTS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Section 701 Payment of Bonds

Section 702 Extension of Payment of Bonds

Section 703 Offices for Servicing Bonds

Section 704 Further Assurance

Section 705 Power to issue Bonds and Pledge Revenues and Other Funds

Section 706 Pledge of the State

Section 707 Creation of Liens

Section 708 Rates, Fees and Charges

Section 709 Maintenance of Reserve Fund

Section 710 Accounts and Reports

Section 711 Tax Covenants

Section 712 Payment of Taxes and Charges

Section 713 Waiver of Laws

Section 714 General

ARTICLE VIII DEFAULTS AND REMEDIES

Section 801 Events of Default

Section 802 Remedies

Section 803 Priority of Payments After Default

Section 804 Termination of Proceedings

Section 805 Bondowners' Direction of Proceedings

Section 806 Restriction on Bondowners' Action

Section 807 Possession of Bonds by Trustee Not Required

Section 808 Remedies Not Exclusive

Section 809 No Waiver of Default

Section 810 Notice of Event of Default

ARTICLE IX CONCERNING THE TRUSTEE

Section 901 Trustee; Appointment and Acceptance of Duties

Section 902 Responsibilities of trustee

Section 903 Evidence on Which Trustee May Act

Section 904 Compensation

Section 905 Certain Permitted Acts

Section 906 Resignation of Trustee

Section 907 Removal of Trustee

Section 908 Appointment of Successor Trustee; Financial Qualifications of Trustee and Successor Trustee

Section 909 Transfer of Rights and Property to Successor Trustee

Section 910 Merger or Consolidation

Section 911 Adoption of Authentication

Section 912 Reports from Trustee

Section 913 Recording and Filing

ARTICLE X SUPPLEMENTAL INDENTURES

Section 1001 Supplemental Indentures Effective Upon Execution by the Trustee

Section 1002 Supplemental Indentures Effective Upon Consent of Trustee

Section 1003 Supplemental Indentures Effective With Consent of Bondowners

Section 1004 General Provisions

ARTICLE XII DEFEASANCE; MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

Section 1201 Defeasance

Section 1202 Evidence of Signatures of Bondowners and Ownership of Bonds

Section 1203 Moneys Held for Particular Bonds

Section 1204 Preservation and Inspection of Documents

Section 1205 No Recourse Under Indenture or on Bonds

Section 1206 Security Instrument

Section 1207 Counterparts

Section 1208 Severability of Invalid Provisions

Section 1209 Holidays

Section 1210 Notices

Section 1211 Notices to Moody's and Standard & Poor's and to Certain Registered Owners

THE SUPPLEMENTAL INDENTURES CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS AND PROVISIONS:

Recitals

ARTICLE I Definitions

Section 101 - Definitions

ARTICLE II Authorization, Terms and Issuance

Section 201 Authorization, Principal Amount, Description and Series

Section 202 Purposes

Section 203 Issue Date and Form

Section 204 Denominations, Maturities and Interest Rates

Section 205 Redemption

Section 206 Sinking fund Installments

ARTICLE III Execution and Delivery

Section 301 Execution and Delivery of Series 1992 Bonds

ARTICLE IV Disposition of Proceeds

Section 401 Disposition of Proceeds

ARTICLE V Trustee, Paying Agent

Section 501 Trustee and Paying Agent

ARTICLE VI Bond Insurance

Section 601 Bond Insurance

ARTICLE VII Book Entry

Section 701 Book Entry

ARTICLE VIII Redemption

Section 801 Notice of Redemption

ARTICLE IX Effective Date

Section 901 Effective Date

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves the resolution on issuance of revenue bonds."

(11) Sale of White River Timber

Brian Rogers, vice president for finance, and Marty Epstein, director of the Statewide Office of Land Management, reported that on April 22, 1992, the city of Yakutat, Southeast Alaska Conservation Council, and the University of Alaska reached agreement on a package of items which provide for both development and conservation of one of the parcels of land, that has been in litigation with the Department of Natural Resources for some years.

PASSED

"The Board of Regents authorizes the administration to solicit proposals, negotiate, and enter into agreements for the sale of the White River Timber."

Regent Henri moved, seconded by Regent L. Williams and passed unanimously that:

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents approves the recommendations of the Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee as stated above, with the addition of Items 9c(10) and 9c(11), the tabling of Item 9c(3), and the amendment of Items 9c(4) and 9c(8). This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

d. Finance, Facilities, and Land Management Committee Report - Information and Other Items

(1) Report on Federal Regulations

At the February 1992 meeting of the Board of Regents, the administration was asked to develop a report on the magnitude and effect of federal regula-tions on the operations of the University of Alaska. In the first part of this report, Brian Rogers, vice president for finance, discussed those federal laws and regulations which affect financial, procurement, and risk management offices.

(2) Golden Valley Electric Association Agreement

Brian Rogers, vice president for finance, reported on a recent agreement made with Golden Valley Electric Association. The agreement states that the university will purchase backup power for 3 megawatts, with more provided power provided if available should the entire system shut down. The university would pay on a monthly basis the demand charge for 3 megawatts, and if more power was needed and could be provided by GVEA, the demand charge would be paid for only those megawatts needed for that period.

(3) Report on MAPTS Lagoon Cleanup

The MAPTS Lagoon Cleanup Project was originally approved by the Board of Regents in December 1991 with the expectation that six inches of contaminated material (200 square yards) from the lagoon. Unfortunately, after completion of the project, approximately four feet needed to be excavated (2,000 square yards). The cleanup has been signed off by the Department of Conservation.

(4) Report on Elvey Building Photo Lab Project

Gerald Neubert, executive director of Facilities Planning and Construction reported that the administration is working on a reduced scope of work with the expectation that the Geophysical Institute will relocate the photo lab into the new building.

e. Committee of the Whole

At the request of the Board, items on the Committee of the Whole Consent Agenda were voted on separately.

(1) Tuition

Removed from Consent Agenda to Item 10C.

(2) Expanded Investment Options for University of Alaska Pension Plan

At the June 13, 1991 Human Resources Committee meeting, Robert Warren, former vice president for human resources, and Jim Lynch, retirement committee chair, discussed the structure of the University of Alaska Pension Plan, some of its limitations, and proposed changes to the plan. Since that time, the Retirement Committee and the human resource offices have developed a restatement of the plan to better meet the needs of employees and participants.

Since inception of the plan in January 1982, participants have had the option to direct employer contributions to an equity fund managed by Equitable Capital Management Corporation, to a fixed income fund managed by the university, or to some combination of the two funds. Participants have also had the opportunity once each quarter to change their investment elections. The investment choices under the current plan are extremely limited and the quarterly option to transfer funds is not adequate to allow participants to effectively manage their retirement funds. Although investment returns for the university-managed fixed fund have been very good, earnings rates are deteriorating and the Retirement Committee believes that a professionally managed fixed income fund will better serve the long-term interests of participants.

The Retirement Committee has drafted a plan restatement and companion trust agreement, included as References 14A&B, providing for the addition of four new fund sponsors and a host of investment options. The new fund sponsors are the same providers as selected for the university's Optional Retirement Plan (ORP). The fund sponsors are Fidelity Investments, Lincoln National Life Insurance Company, Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association - College Retirement Equities Fund (TIAA-CREF), and Variable Annuity Life Insurance Company (VALIC). Having the same fund sponsors for the two programs makes administration of the programs substantially easier and allows ORP participants to better coordinate investment of their retirement funds.

Patty Kastelic, executive director for human resources, and Jim Lynch, retirement committee chair and associate vice president for finance, discussed issues related to the plan restatement and implementation of the proposed changes.

Regent Lamkin moved, seconded by Regent Stitham, and passed with Regents Breeze, Forrer, Gagnon, Helmericks, Kelly, Lamkin, Stitham, Thompson, L. Williams, and R. Williams voting in favor, and Regent Henri voting in opposition that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents approves and adopts the University of Alaska Pension Plan, Amendment, and Restatement effective July 1, 1992 and the University of Alaska Pension Plan Trust Agreement effective July 1, 1992. This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

(3) Compensation

The administration has completed the development of a compensation improvement package. This package includes a retroactive bonus and the minimum salary adjustment for satisfactory perfor-mance as provided in Regents' Policy 04.05.01. Patty Kastelic, executive director for human resources, presented compensation recommenda-tions to the Committee of the Whole.

Regent Forrer moved, seconded by Regent Helmericks, and passed with Regents Breeze, Forrer, Gagnon, Helmericks, Henri, Kelly, Stitham, L. Williams, and R. Williams voting in favor, and Regents Lamkin and Thompson voting in opposition that:

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents approves the recommendation of the administration to award retroactive salary bonuses to permanent full-time and permanent part-time employees. Employees hold-ing term-funded positions will be eligible.

Eligibility for these bonuses shall be limited to permanent full-time and permanent part-time faculty and staff who were in the employ of the university on January 13, 1992 and who had an active assignment for the pay period ending May 2, 1992.

The administration shall distribute $1,897,000, or such amount that is appropriated by the Alaska Legislature and signed by the Governor, in salary bonuses to eligible employees in an equal amount.

This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

f. Committee of the Whole Report - Information and Other Items

(1) Financial Planning for the Remainder of the Decade

President Jerome Komisar made general comments regarding financial planning for the remainder of the decade.

(2) Budget Status Report

With the status of the university's operating and capital budgets changing considerably since the February 1992 meeting of the Board, Wendy Redman, vice president for university relations, and Marsha Hubbard, director of statewide budget development, reported on changes to the governor's proposals for the university's operating capital budget, legislative developments in the House and Senate, university responses to these developments, and plans for dealing with possible budget reductions.

10a. College of Rural Alaska

In November 1990, the Board of Regents asked the President to continue the review of the UAF College of Rural Alaska "…with the view to strengthen the extended campus programs as well as ongoing campus programs." The Board expressed the desire that greater visibility and status should be given to the components of the College of Rural Alaska, and that the commitment to an extended education be considered the responsibility of the entire faculty of the University of Alaska.

University of Alaska Fairbanks Chancellor Joan Wadlow presented the final reports and recommendations made by the review committees.

During the Academic & Student Affairs Committee meeting on April 23, 1992, Regent Stitham introduced a motion directing the administration to reorganize the College of Rural Alaska.

Extensive testimony followed from constituents, employees, and administrators who, in the main, voiced their opposition to the Chancellor's recommendations and to the Board's motion.

The Board accepted a substitute motion from the Academic & Student Affairs Committee during the full Board meeting on April 24, 1992 which incorporated several editorial changes as reflected below.

Regent Thompson requested that this item be removed from the Consent Agenda and asked that the following remarks be added to the minutes to reflect his opinion regarding this action:

"I speak in opposition to this resolution. I speak in opposition for several reasons. The motion talks about a strong, continuing commitment to provide quality programs to rural Alaska. Those are very lofty words, very good words, but that is what they are - words. Because if you go on down, anything that is identified with the rural

college is moved somewhere else. Where we can take action to reaffirm a strong and continuing commitment, we do something else. We disassemble an entity that has a pretty good record; we disassemble an entity that has been a focal point for rural education; we disassemble an entity that, in my view, had a reason for coming into existence into this university just several years ago; and I haven't seen a report that says we have not completed this mission, we've not met these objectives, we're failing here. But yet this group of 11 say that we have to take this traumatic action. I don't think we've given the rural college a fair hearing; I don't think we've given it a chance.

I am also troubled that the faculty, the students, the rural council, AFN, the chairman, and the directors involved in the rural college are adamantly opposed to this action - pretty much unanimously - to the actions that we 11 are going to take. They view it as a dismantling; that's their perception. We are all going to say that no, we're just moving the boxes around and we're going to sensitize all of those places where we're going to move these boxes and we are going to do a better job. We are going to have to do a lot of sensitizing and a lot of running around because we're moving boxes around

[inaudible] .

I have a question in my own mind how this can function when so many people oppose it. The objective of the Board of Regents is to create more opportunity; is to strengthen rural education. Our responsibility and objectives are to see more people graduate, not put up artificial roadblocks; but where things work, support it, enhance it, and move it forward, not move it around so you can't find it. Not put it into larger institutions where a minority group of people have to look harder to find an identity on our campus. What's worked, not only for Alaska Native people, not only for rural people, but for minority people throughout the country is to have an identity - to have an institution that says we cater to your interests and we're here to help more of you get through the institution. I think that is what is needed here.

I think the timing is terrible for this move. I expect it will happen - I'm a realist. But the timing, in my view, is terrible. This university, UAF, is still struggling with an unfortunate set of circumstances that no one wanted visited on us but it visited us anyway and that's the Kleinfeld issue. Put this on top of, unfortunately the Kleinfeld issue, is not enhancing rural education. It is going to be another controversy that we have to try to explain, that we have to try to say 'Yes, but bear with us, we have your best interests at heart.' While you may not recognize it, while you might not perceive it to be that way, it's only because you don't understand it. If you only understood what we meant, we have your best interests at heart, so don't argue with us.' That, to me, is the wrong message.

I think the rural college has done a lot of good; it has its problems, but moving all the key components to other divisions within the university is not the answer. We move rather quickly, and I am still perplexed as to why. No one has come forward and said 'These five things are wrong; they scream out; they require us to move. This action is supported by someone out there.' I have not heard too many people supporting it - all I've heard is opposition.

I'm troubled that the chancellor, I'm troubled that the president, I'm troubled that the majority of the Board supports this action. It is disturbing because, again, we are taking the view that the people who deliver the programs, the people who receive the programs, really don't understand enough about the programs for us to listen to their views and to their input. We have to divine from above what is best. That is archaic - it has gone out a long time ago, and we are supposed to empower and I submit that this is the wrong approach. I do, however, want to say I appreciate my fellow regents hearing me out. They have been courteous throughout. I just think it is a very unfortunate move by us.

In closing, I would like to make a motion that a) there is no fire, there is no compelling reason that this has to be done by July 1 (school is not even in session); and b) would recommend that we take this motion, circulate it to those involved. Perhaps I am wrong; maybe there is support out there; maybe it will come back with a ringing endorsement. I doubt it but at least we will have had consulted, talked to, and sought advice from the people we are impacting. I am also saddened to hear that while we're getting ready to do this, we're still changing it. The people who are delivering it haven't seen it in anything close to a final form. There is massive confusion out there and we can only blame ourselves if we move so rapidly. I would like to make a motion that we table this motion for now, circulate it, and after a decent time, after the board has heard . . . we have not even, furthermore, taken the time to have the Rural College come before this group to give their view of what they are doing right, of the problems they have, and what successes they have had. We have not even given them the courtesy of explaining to us their program, its impact, its effectiveness. We haven't even questioned them on their views. Instead, from on high, we propose, in my view, a lot of wrong actions here for rural education. I make my motion."

Regent Thompson moved to table the College of Rural Alaska motion until the December 1992 Board of Regents' meeting. Regent Henri seconded the motion and it failed with Regents Henri and Thompson voting in favor, and Regents Breeze, Forrer, Gagnon, Helmericks, Kelly, Lamkin, Stitham, L. Williams, and R. Williams voting in opposition.

Regent Henri requested that he be associated with Regent Thompson's remarks regarding the College of Rural Alaska action.

Regent Stitham moved, seconded by Regent Helmericks, and passed with Regents Breeze, Forrer, Gagnon, Helmericks, Kelly, Lamkin, Stitham, L. Williams, and R. Williams voting in favor, and Regents Henri and Thompson voting in opposition that:

PASSED

"The Board of Regents reaffirms its strong, continuing commitment to providing quality under-graduate and graduate instruction to rural Alaska. The Board's intent is to improve and strengthen that by increasing access to University of Alaska services and programs and by providing more administrative and budgetary control directly to the rural sites of the University of Alaska to determine the University's response to local needs. Therefore, the Board directs the following actions:

1. (a) The College of Rural Alaska shall consist of the current rural sites, the School of Career and Continuing Education, voca-tional education and the Rural Develop-ment program. The Boards' intent is that the UAF chancellor shall work with the rural site directors to determine the location of the Rural Development program. The College will be led by an executive dean who reports directly to the chancellor.

(b) All current advisory committees involved with the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Rural Alaska shall remain in place.

(c) Rural site directors will directly administer funds allocated to their respective campuses and will be responsible for designating and recommending those individuals to be appointed as faculty members for their respective campuses, and for contracting with other University of Alaska units for services.

(d) Further, they shall coordinate all university programs and services in their region; they shall also have the current budget funding of the X-CED program transferred to their rural site budget.

2. All MAUs shall have a clearly stated rural mission.

3. The Department of Behavioral Sciences and the Department of Human Services shall move to the College of Liberal Arts - UAF.

4. (a) The Department of Education, including X-CED and the Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, shall become the School of Education housed in the College of Liberal Arts, and led by a director.

(b) All students in the School of Education shall meet common standards for assessment and graduation from the program.

This motion shall take effect immediately and the actions shall be implemented by July 1, 1992. The President will report on the progress of implementation and the budgetary changes at the June 1992 Board of Regents' meeting. This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

10b. Tuition

At the February 1992 meeting of the Board of Regents, the administration proposed a tuition increase for fall 1992 based on the $173 million general fund budget proposal by the state administration. Action was postponed by the regents until the April 1992 meeting. Since the February meeting, the state administration reduced its general fund request for the university by an additional $17 million. In order to partially offset the dramatic effect of this level of budget reduction, the administration is requesting a second tuition increase for the spring 1993 semester.

If there is no action by the Board of Regents, tuition is scheduled to increase from $50 per credit hour in the current academic year to $55 per credit hour beginning in fall 1992, and the consolidated fee is scheduled to drop from the current 13 credits to 12 credits in fall 1992. The administration is instead proposing that the regents increase tuition per credit hour to $58 for the fall 1992 semester and $65 for the spring 1993 semester, with consolidated fee levels increasing to 14 credits in fall 1992 and 15 credits in fall 1993.

Brian Rogers, vice president for finance, reviewed tuition options, the role of tuition in university budgeting, and tuition levels in other states.

Many students testified on the proposed tuition increase, especially against the possibility of raised tuition in the spring, and a consolidated cap set at 14 credits rather than at 12 credits.

Regent Kelly moved the following three motions, seconded by Regent Forrer, and passed unanimously:

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents revises Regents' Policy 05.10.01(K) (2) as follows:

2. Effective the fall 1992 semester

Students enrolled in more than 13 [12] under-graduate or more than 9 graduate credit hours shall pay consolidated tuition equal to the tuition for 13 [12] undergraduate or 9 graduate credit hours, respectively.

This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

PASSED AS AMENDED

"The Board of Regents adopts the following tuition rates for the 1992-1993 academic year:

Tuition rates effective for instruction which begins the fall semester of 1992 are as follows:

Per Credit Hr Per Credit Hr

Resident Nonresident

Graduate Courses $116 $232

Undergraduate Courses $58 $174

Students taking more than 13 undergraduate credit hours or more than 9 graduate credit hours per semester will pay consolidated tuition as follows:

Resident Nonresident

Graduate Courses $1,044 $2,088

Undergraduate Courses $754 $2,262

This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

PASSED

"The Board of Regents adopts the following tuition rates for the fall 1992 semester:

Tuition rates effective for instruction which begins the fall semester of 1992 are as follows:

Per Credit Hr Per Credit Hr

Resident Nonresident

Prince William Sound

Community College $48 $144

This motion is effective April 24, 1992."

10c. Report from Board of Regents' Representatives on the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education

Regent Helmericks reported on the March 19-20, 1992 meet-ing of the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE). Topics discussed at that meeting included the need for a plan for the future for capital investment, and the future of ACPE itself.

Commission members directed the ACPE administration to revise the Millennium Plan to enable the student loan fund to revolve by the year 2000, and to explore the feasibility of capital stock. With fewer general funds being appropriated, this action will protect the student loan program from eventually disappearing. Regent Helmericks spoke of discussions regard-ing the high probability of reduced loans per student in the future, and as well as a change in policy from the universal program it is now to a need-based program.

Regent Helmericks also reported on discussions occurring regarding the dismantling or reorganization of the ACPE.

The next meeting of the ACPE will be on June 5-6, 1992 in Anchorage.

11. Regents' and Presidents' Comments

Regent Lamkin expressed the desire for more extensive contacts with students at all campuses and requested that he be allowed to visit the rural campuses during the next fiscal year.

Regent Forrer congratulated Dr. Michael Rice on his appoint-ment as vice chancellor for administration at UAF; stressed the need for more press coverage; and hoped for the best from actions taken at this board meeting.

Regent Breeze expressed her enjoyment in hearing chancellors' and administrative reports early rather than at the end of the agenda; stated the need to better publicize the university's plans and missions; and asked again that the university conduct a communications audit.

Regent Helmericks expressed his conviction that a formula-based plan on tuition schedules must be instituted which will systematically raise rates until they are par with competitive institutions, that the consolidated cap must be abolished, and that the university must halt the downward spiral of deferred maintenance. He also stated his commitment to making the College of Rural Alaska reorganization plan work.

Regent Stitham thanked Chancellor Lind and the faculty, staff and students who contributed to the Raven's Tail Weaving demonstration; thanked Regent Lamkin and the students for their excellent presentation on the tuition issue; expressed her confidence in the employees and staff of the College of Rural Alaska in implementing the reorganization; and thanked the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce for their commitment and solidarity in support of the University of Alaska system.

Regent Henri advocated the restriction of items coming before the Board at the last minute and requested a change in Regents' Bylaws stating that agendas be forwarded to members 14 days in advance; and also recommended that the Board of Regents have more involvement in approving appointments of chancellors, vice presidents, and vice chancellors.

Regent L. Williams expressed his frustration over the university's budget planning process during declining revenue times, and strongly urged that the university begin planning on a reduced budget basis.

Regent Kelly reminded the Board that the budget issue has several different fronts, i.e., political, internal; and different approaches must be used for each area. Regent Kelly thanked the students for their efforts in lobbying the legislature; and spoke to the College of Rural Alaska discussion, stating that there are many different paths that lead to the same goal, that the Board has chosen a path, and committed himself toward the goals established by the Board.

Regent Thompson thanked the president of the Board for th way the discussion on the Rural College was conducted, expressed his disappointment with the results, but stated his support for making this decision work. He requested that if the proposed plan is unsuccessful, that the Board admit to it and pursue a different course of action. Regent Thompson voiced his appreciation to Phil Yonker and the members of the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce for their outstanding support of the university; and complimented the Juneau campus participants involved in the Raven's Tail Weaving demonstration.

University President Komisar thanked the regents for their patience and energies during the meeting. He assured the Board that the intent of the Board concerning the College of Rural Alaska was clearly understood by Chancellor Wadlow and him, and stated his commitment to the goal that CRA deliver the kind of service expected by the Board. Dr. Komisar reviewed the planning processes currently taking place and stated his intent to hold another Board of Regents' retreat in the near future to explore more philosophical planning.

Board President Williams thanked the regents for their endurance during an arduous, but critical meeting; commented on the process of changing the College of Rural Alaska; thanked the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce for focusing attention on the need to preserve our facilities and not be all things to all people.

12. Other Items of Concern to the Board of Regents

None

13. Adjourn

Board President Williams adjourned the meeting at 3:53 p.m.

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